When attending a training session on how not to mess up your life, try not to mess up your life


Like the NFL, the NBA has its own Rookie Transition Program for introducing new players to important issues such as life skills, money management, dealing with the media, and the importance of character and image in avoiding public embarrassment. Apparently it took longer than usual for these lessons to sink in for Mario Chalmers and Darrell Arthur, since they were caught in their hotel room with two unspecified women, and security claimed to have smelled marijuana although none was found. They were fined $20,000 apiece, and a fellow player was fined $50,000 for his involvement and failure to cooperate with the investigation.

The two players also were ordered to go through the training a second time. Maybe this time, they'll learn something.

Follow-up: ESPN has a summary of events. Fire alarm. Refusing to let security into the room. Repeated toilet flushing. Gotta love it.

Comments (20)
  1. Anonymous says:

    Well, maybe they didn’t get to the part in the program yet where they tell you not to put yourself in a position where it appears that you’re doing drugs and sleeping with hookers. :)

    Sending them home from the program, meaning they don’t get to complete it the first time round, does seem like a bit of a dumb thing to do. It would be like being in rehab, getting caught with booze (or whatever it is you’re in for) and then, instead of just staying there until you are actually dry, being thrown out and told you’ll have to come back later in order to start again.

    [On the other hand, you don’t want them bringing booze to the treatment center and screwing up the other patients… -Raymond]
  2. Anonymous says:

    Perhaps there was some confusion and they were sent on the rock star "learn to enjoy your life" training course by mistake.

  3. Anonymous says:

    So the guys have their privacy invaded, get ripped off of loads of money, and Raymond thinks it’s fabulous. Love you!

  4. Anonymous says:

    I don’t see how their privacy was invaded.  The fire alarm went off and (probably by law) the room had to be inspected.  And as far as getting "ripped off", they knew the rules when they joined the league; I have no sympathy for them.  It doesn’t even matter in the long run; they are still going to make their millions of dollars.  They just have to suffer some temporary public embarrassment.  Sounds like a pretty good deal to me; Stern probably would have liked the punishment to be much harsher.

  5. Anonymous says:

    And this is relevant to Windows software development how?

  6. Anonymous says:

    These guys only have two brain cells: one for the vital functions (eat, breath, heartbeat, etc), one to play basketball. That’s what happens when you give them a ton of money.

  7. Anonymous says:

    And this is relevant to Windows software development how?

    I wasn’t aware this was a blog dedicated to Windows software development. Raymond is free to post about whatever he feels like posting, which happens to be, well, about 50% non-Windows software development.

  8. Anonymous says:

    Since when is being "caught with women" a crime?

  9. Anonymous says:

    Erik: When you’ve paid them.  Also note that the NBA fined them, not the government.  The NBA was not enforcing the law, just their own standards.  There need not have been a crime.

  10. Anonymous says:

    @Patrick B

    Remember, the purpose of this blog is not actually to establish a blogging point where individuals can enrich their learns on facilitating and leveraging .NET-related activities most effectively.

    You can’t possibly have been following this blog very long if this is the first thing you’ve seen that is not Windows development.

  11. Anonymous says:

    I wasn’t aware it was necessary to be celibate to be a basketball player, I thought that was for the priesthood.

  12. Anonymous says:

    ——"I wasn’t aware it was necessary to be celibate to be a basketball player, I thought that was for the priesthood."——

    They split the priest’s functions. The players have to be celibate, and the administrators hypocritical.

  13. Anonymous says:

    The players have to be celibate, and the administrators hypocritical.

    :))

  14. Anonymous says:

    So they made an oopsie and set off the fire alarm. In the end they were just having a bit of fun with some hookers and marijuana. Why would that interest us?

  15. Anonymous says:

    Wow, it wasn’t enough for everyone to ruin the technical articles, now the "humor" articles have to be nitpicked to death too.

  16. Anonymous says:

    Hmmm.  The script that posts Raymond’s articles failed to run.  My day is ruined :(

  17. Anonymous says:

    Depends on where you are

    It was New York state; I believe prostitution and marijuana use are illegal there. If I’m wrong, someone please correct me.

    And while this might be illegal in the US, I don’t think what they did is unethical.

    Then imagine, as I said, that they set an actual fire in the room, and prevented anyone from entering their room long enough for the fire to spread to other rooms, causing untold amounts of damage as well as putting the lives of other people (who are probably asleep, considering it was 2 AM) in jeopardy. Is it unethical now?

    Yes, a real fire didn’t occur (besides the lighter and the joint), but the fire alarm went off, and hotel management had a duty to ensure that there was no actual fire, and the players hindered them in their duty.

  18. Anonymous says:

    > So they made an oopsie and set off the fire alarm.

    And then refused to let anyone in the room to inspect it, which, if there were an actual fire, would be interpreted as being extraordinarily callous towards the personal safety of the other patrons of the hotel.

    > In the end they were just having a bit of fun with some hookers and marijuana.

    *Just* prostitution and drug use? My bad, I thought they were breaking the law.

    The NBA has had an image problem for a while now, culminating with the Palace brawl and now the Donaghy scandal. It’s going to be a while before it’s going to be seen as a "clean" league; Stern is livid because if the rookies don’t start living clean now, the league will be tainted by their actions during their entire careers.

  19. Anonymous says:

    >Erik: When you’ve paid them.

    I still don’t see where it says the women were hookers.  So how is spending the night with two women “messing up your life?”

    If marijuana was involved- well that’s a crime and I side with the NBA authorities.  But the issue with the women is different.  Raymond appears to be siding with the NBA authorities here, by saying “Maybe this time, they’ll learn something.” I don’t think it’s a matter of learning. It’s quite possible the players resent being told how to spend their personal time. They may not care what the NBA thinks of their actions, and if that’s the case, I agree with them.

    [“… messing up your life” was just an attempt at a catchy headline. I had a nitpicker’s corner ready but decided not to run it. Maybe I should have. One of the things they were supposed to learn is “Activities you should avoid because they will result in embarrassment to you and the league when they appear in the newspaper.” That’s the lesson they failed to learn. Whether this is a valid lesson I don’t really care. I just enjoyed the irony. -Raymond]
  20. Anonymous says:

    > *Just* prostitution and drug use? My bad, I thought they were breaking the law.

    Depends on where you are, where I live, both are legal (ok, marijuana is not technically legal but for all intents and purposes it is)

    And while this might be illegal in the US, I don’t think what they did is unethical.

Comments are closed.