Wedding + two-year-old flower girl = wildcard


I was in San Francisco this weekend for a wedding. The flower girl was the bride's two-year-old niece, and when you add a two-year-old to the wedding party, you never know what's going to happen, because two-year-olds don't understand the world the same way adults do.

During the unity candle ceremony, the two-year-old pushed her way to the table, joining the bride and groom, in order to get a front-row seat for the ritual. And then when the unity candle was lit, she tried to blow it out.

Because when you're two years old, the only time you see people make a big deal about lighting a candle is when it's atop a birthday cake, and you know what to do with birthday candles!

Comments (22)
  1. John says:

    "Unity candle"?  Maybe I’m just not in touch with my feminine side, but this "tradition" sounds like another step in the continuing wussification of America.  Let me guess, was the two-year-old put in "time-out"?  Spanking is long overdue for a comeback.  How I long for the days when a man could be a man and a woman could be a woman.

  2. J says:

    Awesome, John.  Beat the child because she didn’t understand the unity candle.  Awesome.

  3. Jim says:

    Should we have a separate candle as well when we divorce

  4. Tom says:

    We had a 3-year old ring-bearer who got bored and untied the ribbon from the pillow and promptly began swinging it around his body. Thankfully, the videographer did manage to catch it on the video so we were able to see it.

  5. nathan_works says:

    Should have given the little girl a DS or PSP or somesuch to keep her occupied.

  6. Jonathan Pryor says:

    Nathan, have you ever met a 2 year old?  I wouldn’t trust my 3 year old with a DS or PSP, never mind a 2 year old…

  7. jcoehoorn says:

    Funny, about six months ago my 2-year-old daughter was a flower girl at my sister’s wedding.  

    We had plans, though.  We didn’t make her stand up front during the entire ceremony.  I was in the wedding party, and used one of her favorite stuffed animals to encourage her progress down the aisle, and as soon as my father gave away the bride he took my daughter back to the seats with him.

  8. dbt says:

    My 3 year old daughter finished dropping the flower petals and immediately came and sat with me.  My 7 year old ring-bearer decided to stand up front (the plan was for him to come sit with me too), and he did fantastic.

    Sometimes it’s preparation, sometimes it’s just good luck. :)

  9. John says:

    It’s not easy being a visionary.

  10. RCCola says:

    [Because when you’re two years old, the only time you see people make a big deal about lighting a candle is when it’s atop a birthday cake]

    …unless you’re jewish

  11. Grumpy says:

    Hey, John, why don’t you piss on your own parade?  You’ve read three paragraphs about someone else’s wedding, and you’re ready to pass judgment on who is a wuss and who isn’t.

    Ya know what?  Shut your freaking mouth, and mind your own business.  How’s that for wussification?  How do you know what *someone else* wanted to do for their wedding?

    It’s a story about someone’s kid, not your opportunity to whine about society.

  12. Steve D says:

    My niece (now 18) was our flower girl when she was less than three.  We expected that she may provide some comedy relief and she was great – wandering around us during the ceremony, wanting to share the communion and ducking under the ribbon ahead of us at the reception.  And no fears or tears, which was our only concern before the event.

  13. Steve D says:

    My niece (now 18) was our flower girl when she was less than three.  We expected that she may provide some comedy relief and she was great – wandering around us during the ceremony, wanting to share the communion and ducking under the ribbon ahead of us at the reception.  And no fears or tears, which was our only concern before the event.

  14. Gabe says:

    Anything under 6 or 7 years old is a wildcard. If it works for you, consider yourselves lucky. I’ve seen kids run down the aisle screaming, girls sitting on the altar lifting their skirts over their heads, and some not even want to perform after begging for the honor.

  15. Rich says:

    My 4 year old niece started crying loudly when she could not come down the aisle with my bride, and her older brother(7), the ring bearer, was so angry at her for not coming down the aisle with him (as she was meant to) he stomped down the aisle looking like he was going to kill someone.

    I enjoyed the entertainment

  16. Jack V. says:

    "another step in the continuing wussification of America… was the two-year-old put in "time-out"?  Spanking is long overdue for a comeback.  How I long for the days when a man could be a man and a woman could be a woman."

    You advocate spanking as part of the wedding ceremony? I think that’d be a hilariously great idea, but I suspect lots of people may find it inappropriate :)

  17. Neil (SM) says:

    Heh, the wussification of America. Are weddings supposed to have chainsaws and handguns or something?  Usually when you see a comment like that it’s coming from someone who’s fairly ‘wussified’ himself.

  18. nathan_works says:

    Jonathan, see earlier thread about kids and DS/cell phones and DVD players in cars..

  19. John says:

    "Are weddings supposed to have chainsaws and handguns or something?"

    I think he’s got it!

  20. ERock says:

    ‘"Are weddings supposed to have chainsaws and handguns or something?"

    I think he’s got it!’

    If the wedding really is a reenactment of Doom, I would like to RSVP now.

  21. RCCola says:

    "Are weddings supposed to have chainsaws and handguns or something?"

    If they are, don’t have the wedding in St. Louis. While leaving from their airport we noticed a glass case full of examples of things you shouldn’t pack in your luggage – one of the items…a chainsaw.  

  22. steven says:

    Is that a shotgun wedding, then?

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