vswhere is now installed with Visual Studio 2017

Starting in the latest preview release of Visual Studio version 15.2 (26418.1-Preview), you can now find vswhere installed in “%ProgramFiles(x86)%\Microsoft Visual Studio\Installer” (on 32-bit operating systems before Windows 10, you should use “%ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Visual Studio\Installer”). While I initially made vswhere.exe available via NuGet and Chocolatey for easy acquisition, some projects do not use package managers… Read more

Cleaning up the Visual Studio 2017 package cache

With the ability to disable or move the package cache for Visual Studio 2017 and other products installed with the new installer, packages are removed for whatever instance(s) you are installing, modifying, or repairing. If you have a lot of instances and want to clean all of them up easily from the command line –… Read more

Moving or disabling the package cache for Visual Studio 2017

In the latest preview release of Visual Studio we are introducing the ability to disable (or re-enable) the package cache, or move it to another drive. This can be done using the command line or the registry, which can be deployed on a domain using group policy. This will be generally available in Visual Studio… Read more

vswhere now searches older versions of Visual Studio

One of the top requests I kept hearing for vswhere was to also search older versions of Visual Studio. You can now do that starting with the latest release. Even if you don’t have Visual Studio 2017 or newer installed – which means the query API is not even registered – you can use vswhere… Read more

Fast acquisition of vswhere

I introduced vswhere last week as an easy means to locate Visual Studio 2017 and newer, along with other products installed with our new installer that provides faster downloads and installs – even for full installs (which has roughly doubled in size with lots of new third-party content). vswhere was designed to be a fast,… Read more

vswhere Available

After feedback on the VSSetup PowerShell module to query Visual Studio 2017 and related products, I’m pleased to say that a native, single-file executable is available on GitHub: vswhere. The VSSetup PowerShell module is also available on GitHub and provides a number of benefits for PowerShell scripts, but build tools and CMake and deployment scripts… Read more

Visual Studio Setup PowerShell Module Available

To make the new setup configuration APIs more accessible to developers, we have published the “VSSetup” PowerShell module on powershellgallery.com, making it quick and easy to install. If you have Windows Management Framework (WMF) 5.0 or newer – installed with Windows 10 – or PowerShellGet for PowerShell 3.0 or 4.0, you can run the following… Read more

Documentation available for the Setup Configuration API

Visual Studio 2017 has brought big changes to extensibility that allow developers to install extensions to different instances and install dependencies. In support of multiple instances, a fast API was required that tools can use to find and launch VS and related tools, or to install extensions. I previously published some samples, and now documentation… Read more

Changes to Visual Studio “15” Setup

We’ve listened to feedback over the years, and while each new release brought changes to the setup experience of Visual Studio and related products, none have been more significant than what we’re doing for Visual Studio “15”. New setup engine With Visual Studio supporting so many platforms and toolkits, one of the goals for Visual… Read more

Insert GUIDs directly into Visual Studio Code

Let me preface this by stating I love Visual Studio Code! While I think its big, older brother Visual Studio is great for large solutions or even small projects where project files are managed automatically by the IDE, Code work great for small, loose projects and is very fast. I still use Vim for a… Read more