How to add the application compatibility section with Visual C++ 2008?

If you wonder what I’m talking about when mentioning the compatibility section, have a look at my previous blog entry. To start with, I added a Compatibility.manifest file to my project: <?xml version=”1.0″ encoding=”utf-8″ standalone=”yes”?> <assembly xmlns=”urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v1″ manifestVersion=”1.0″>    <compatibility xmlns=”urn:schemas-microsoft-com:compatibility.v1″>       <application>          <supportedOS Id=”{e2011457-1546-43c5-a5fe-008deee3d3f0}”/>          <supportedOS Id=”{35138b9a-5d96-4fbd-8e2d-a2440225f93a}”/>       </application>    </compatibility> </assembly>  …

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The new compatibility section in the Application Manifest

This is still the same Application Manifest that you store in your Win32 Resource or put next to your executable (i.e. “MyExecutable.exe.manifest” ). Under Windows XP, this manifest allowed you to create Isolated Applications and Side-by-side Assemblies. Under Windows Vista, we added the DPI Awareness and execution level for your application. Under Windows 7, we…

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Consider not using the Frame Pointer Optimization when building your software

Stack tracing is a very useful functionality for tracking both the causes of performance problems and reliability issues. With Frame Pointer Optimization disabled, one can easily build the call chain by walking through the stack frame pointers.   Because of potential code size increase and performance degradation, Independent Software Vendors tend to use the /Oy…

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UI0Detect, WlS0WndH and a lie…

http://blogs.msdn.com/yvesdolc/archive/2009/09/11/ui0detect-wls0wndh-and-a-lie.aspx   In my prior to last entry, I took a shortcut: your Windows Service user interface can be seen on Windows Vista and still on Windows 7. But beware, it’s not by default, not without additional end user involvement and very likely to no longer be there under Windows 8! It’s all about the…

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