Using UI Automation to enable web browsing with a switch device

This post describes how I used the Windows UI Automation (UIA) API in a Windows Forms app, in order to add support for web browsing with a switch device to one of my assistive technology apps.     Figure 1: Scan highlighting of a hyperlink on a web page.   Background A couple of months…

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Does your XAML UI support the Patterns that your customer needs?

This post encourages you to let the XAML Framework do lots of the work required to make your UI accessible to all your customers. The UI Automation (UIA) API exposes your UI elements through a programmatically accessible hierarchical tree, and assistive technology (AT) tools such as screen readers will present those elements in whatever way…

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Allowing Narrator gestures to zoom at the explorable map

While making the demo video associated with Updating the explorable map to add support for scrolling with a screen reader, which shows how to zoom in and zoom out on the map using Narrator, I did feel that it was pretty tedious to have to swipe so many times to reach the Zoom buttons. Narrator…

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Using UI Automation to explore a map

A few weeks ago I was having coffee with a colleague who’s blind, and I asked him about exploring a map. He said that he’d like to be able to move his finger over a map of the US, and have the name of the state beneath his finger spoken. By doing this, he could…


Solutions to some common accessibility issues found in XAML apps

My recent post, Learn about cool things you can do with UI Automation, and help teams around you at the same time, discussed how as part you learning how to use the super-useful Windows UI Automation (UIA) API, you could write code which looks for accessibility issues in apps built by teams near you. By…