Released: Windows SDK for Windows 7 and .NET Framework 3.5 SP1: Beta


The Windows SDK for Windows 7 and .NET Framework 3.5 SP1: Beta has been released (ISO-format).  As many of you are already aware, the release of Windows 7 Beta and Windows Server 2008 R2 Beta occurred barely 3 weeks ago.  What some of you may not be aware of however, is that there also was a Beta release of the Windows SDK that coincided.  The Windows SDK provides documentation, samples, header files, libraries, and tools designed to help you develop Windows applications using native (Win32®) and/or managed (.NET Framework) technologies.


 


Platform Compatibility:


This beta release of the Windows SDK is compatible with Windows 7 Beta,  Windows Server 2008 R2 Beta,  Windows Server 2008, .NET Framework 3.5 Service Pack 1, Windows Vista SP1, and Windows XP SP3.


 


Visual Studio Compatibility:


This beta release of the Windows SDK is compatible with Visual Studio 2008 SP1; including Visual Studio Express Editions.  


 


What’s New:


The following is a small sampling of what’s in this Beta SDK.


·         Documentation – New Windows 7 Developer Guide and Quality cookbook


·         Samples – Nearly 250 samples added and refreshed during Beta


·         The Windows SDK Configuration Tool has been fixed (and can be used with the Windows SDK for Server 2008)


·         Visual Studio 2008 SP1 C++ command line compiler toolset and matching CRT


Learn More:


Stayed tuned to the Windows SDK blog as well as the Windows SDK MSDN Developer Center over the coming weeks for more information about the Windows SDK.  As always, please look over the Release Notes for a description of known issues before you install the SDK.


 


Tell us what you think:


Send your thoughts to the Windows SDK Feedback alias.  Tell us how you use the SDK and what we can do to make your life easier.


 


Thank you


Barry R. Butterklee


Windows SDK Release PM


Comments (13)

  1. Does this mean that this is, in effect, the first Windows SDK that cannot be used to target XP?

  2. Kevin Daly says:

    Are there any .NET samples that target new Windows 7 features?

    .NET developers don’t seem to be getting much Windows 7 love so far, I hope that changes.

    (I still think "WinFX" as the idea was sold in late 2003 was a good idea…)

  3. Kevin Daly says:

    PS. I downloaded the Windows 7 Developer Guide: pretty much all it has to say about managed code is to point out the things that could previously only be done in .NET that can now be done in native code.

    Overall it looks like a big victory for all the World’s C++ snobs suffering from rampant Real Programmerism (I’m not saying native code shouldn’t have been catered for, only that managed code doesn’t appear to be taken seriously. NET appears to have been consigned to a very VB6-like ghetto).

  4. mitchman says:

    Thank you.  However, the new taskbar API (particular for generating thumbnails) is not documented at all.  When will this be fixed?  

  5. Brian Cost says:

    pminaev, Windows XP was inadvertently left off the list of supported operating systems but I’ve corrected the blog post.  Thanks for the head’s up.  The Windows SDK for Windows 7 can be installed on Windows XPSP3, and can also be used to create applications for Windows XP SP3.  The Windows SDK can be used with all supported operating systems.

    –Karin Meier

  6. Brian Cost says:

    Mitchman, the taskbar documentation will be updated for the RC release.   BTW, have you see the  taskbar integration samples that install to [winsdk]SampleswinuiShellTaskbarIntegration?

    –Karin Meier

  7. Windows SDK for Windows 7 and .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 の詳細

  8. mitchman says:

    Karin, yes I have, but they don’t really cover the new thumbnail related APIs.   Anyway, looking forward to the RC documentation.

  9. Finally got enough snow to delay school for a couple of hours. Oslo/CSD/Queing/Azure/WCF Charles Young takes a closer look at the new CTP of Oslo that I reported the other day He also references this post for what’s new and changed in the Oslo CTP Brian

  10. Jalf says:

    "Overall it looks like a big victory for all the World’s C++ snobs suffering from rampant Real Programmerism (I’m not saying native code shouldn’t have been catered for, only that managed code doesn’t appear to be taken seriously. NET appears to have been consigned to a very VB6-like ghetto)."

    That’s an odd way to look at it (and quite .NET-snobbish 😉

    The Windows API is native code. WIN32 exposes new functionality in C, which .NET can then choose to repackage and wrap. But *until* it has been exposed as native code, there’s in general no way .NET can get at it.

    So getting a Windows SDK out which supports Win7’s new features in C++ is the first step in getting it made available in .NET too. Now it’s up to the .NET team to release the appropriate wrappers. It’s not about catering to native developers (and anyone who’s tried using Visual Studio for both C++ and C# knows full well that the former isn’t Microsoft’s top priority), it’s about making new capabilities available in the most basic API, so that high-level API’s like .NET can take that and expose it in their own preferred language.

  11. Brian Cost says:

    Kevin Daly, the .NET Framework does take the new Windows 7 features seriously. But it cannot include all the new OS features for  various reasons, including support for downlevel platforms like Vista and XP.

    While .NET developers can write interop code to access new Window 7 features, the challenges associated with writing interop code is appreciated by Microsoft. We are creating interop library (managed wrappers for the native APIs) to enable .NET developers to access some of the new Windows 7 features without having to write interop code. This library will be released as source library around the time of Windows 7 release. This is effectively the next generation of VistaBridge library which included wrappers for some of the Vista features that are not available in .NET Framework.

  12. scrutr says:

    Are there any Ribbon samples or guides on how to get started?