Linq to ASCII Art

Last night I was searching for an audio version of Painters and Hackers by Paul Graham.  Pretty soon I had completely forgotten about the book and found myself reading the Wikipedia article about Hackers.  Isn’t Internet search great? Of all of the things in the article, the one thing that captured my attention was the…

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The Virtues of Laziness

It seems that I riled some people up with my blog post yesterday.  After some thought, I think the primary reason that there was some backlash is because some people feel that I violated one of the sacred principles of FP:  lists are *the* data structure.  Well, let me set the matter straight.  I love…

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Why all the love for lists?

One of the things that I have noticed when participating in interviews with potential candidates is that most candidates have a favorite data structure.  Presumably this is the data structure that they feel the most comfortable with.  The problem is that no matter what coding question I ask them, they see the answer through the lenses of their…

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Baby Names, Nameless Keys, and Mumbling

Baby Names I recently finished reading Freakonomics.  It is a fascinating book about a number of strange phenomena.  Its topics range from the economics of dealing crack to cheating in sumo wrestling.  Among the sundry topics is a discussion concerning the psychology and sociology underlying babies names. This topic has interested me ever since I found out that…

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Memoization and Anonymous Recursion

Keith Farmer brought it to my attention that there is at least a little confusion about how closures work.  Hopefully, I can help shed a little light on the subject.  The question is why doesn’t the following code actually memoize fib in the call to Test? Func<int, int> fib = null;fib = n => n >…

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Anonymous Recursion in C#

Recursion is beautiful and lambdas are the ultimate abstraction.  But how can they be used together?  Lambdas are anonymous functions and recursion requires names.  Let’s try to define a lambda that computes the nth fibonacci number. Func<int, int> fib = n => n > 1 ? fib(n – 1) + fib(n – 2) : n;…

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