Gmail and Hotmail


Google’s Gmail was
announced last

week on April Fool’s Day. It’s free email with a gigabyte of storage.

Throughout the day, I kept
wondering, "Could this be an April Fool’s joke?" Since they
announced on April 1, I was essentially thinking about Gmail the whole day.
Heck, I’ve been thinking about it so much that I decided to write this blog
entry about it, and Gmail isn’t not even available yet to the general public. Brilliant

marketing.

Anyway, Kevin Fox who works on Gmail posted

some screenshots
to tease us all.
Some others.

It also looks like someone named Paul posted up a special message for his S.O. on the

Gmail homepage.
If you click the "Happy Birthday April!" link
at the bottom of the Gmail homepage,

href="https://gmail.google.com/gmail/html/april.html">you see
the picture
here: [image]

. That’s nice.

Which brings me to an observation about MSN. This
is similar to
my previous
rant about Office HTML
, drawing on my
pre-Microsoft past of being a web guy.

Comparing those Gmail screenshots above to what we currently have in Hotmail, I
notice:

  • Gmail, like most of Google, feels like a web site.  It’s mostly

    text,
    links, and buttons with very few pictures.  I’m sure it’s fast.

  • Hotmail, like most of MSN, feels like a computer program, in this
    case Outlook.  It’s prettier than Gmail, looks more futuristic, and
    feels more powerful.

But, I sometimes feel that MSN doesn’t get the web. As an example,
here’s part of Hotmail’s main page after you login. What parts do you think are

clickable?

[image]

I’d guess the red text and the blue text since they’re different colors from
the normal black text.

Answer:

[image]

Wow, was I off.

If Hotmail just stuck to the default web color settings, we’d get blue,
underlined links, and I’d know exactly where to click. How simple would that be?
Every time I run into something like this, I think, "Why do we need
something so complicated?  I’d prefer a simpler web site that was easier to
use."

But that wouldn’t be MSN. Despite
what some say,

I think Microsoft does a great job innovating.
MSN in particular has made an incredible transformation these past few years despite

issues like the one above.
My current MSN favorite is MSN Video,
essentially the only place on the web where I can watch TV clips for free.
It’s great, and nothing like the average web site.

Hotmail and Gmail.
MSN Search and Google.
Exciting times ahead.


Comments (11)

  1. Wayne,

    >> essentially the only place on the web where I can watch TV clips for free

    of course only incase you’re located in the us.

    WM_FYI

    thomas woelfer

  2. Anonymous says:

    LSN WebLog » screen shots of gmail

  3. Gmail by Google

    By S. A. J. Shirazi

    Google has started testing its free web based email module called Gmail. Amongst privacy debate, the launch appears to have shaken up free web email and advertising market. Analysts say Gmail is not only an expansion of Google business but is also likely to change how people use their email, number one activity on the web.

    I am using Gmail since some email aficionados were offered to give the preview test version of Gmail a whirl. I already am relying on the search box in my inbox even with a small quantity of emails there. It seems to be a simple, powerful and feature-packed email service: 1 gigabyte of emails (eight billion bits, that is 500 times the size of Hotmail and 250 times of Yahoo Mail), keywords (called labels) based email storage and management system, inbox Google search, easy spam reporting and filtering. Emails are threaded in context called conversation and all connected emails can be viewed, one on top of the other, and All Mail users’ personal searchable and permanent email achieve. Advertisements are there but no annoying pop-ups, under-pops or banners.

    The interface is simple and easy but those who have been using Microsoft’s Hotmail and Yahoo Mail and or Outlook will need getting used to it. There are about 20 handy keyboard shortcuts that allow doing everything without lifting the hand from the keyboard, which can be activated and practised. New lingoes like newer and older, expanded all and collapse, conversation and star system look strange in the beginning. Rich and searchable help section is available. Registration is neat; simple.

    Gmail inbox is uncluttered, aesthetic and practical. Along with the subject header, a line in the inbox demonstrates the sender, respondent and the total number of emails represented in particular conversations. Click on that line and see all the replies to a message stacked below the original, making it easy to follow a conversation thread. Next to each message is an indication of when it was sent (two minutes ago, three days ago). Subject is displayed at the top in bold when email opens. By typing in a search query, Gmail explores any sent or received message(s) in an archive, showing entire sequence of email messages related to the conversations.

    Presently, Gmail is in English and only supports Microsoft Internet Explorer, Netscape, and Mozilla browsers. The users of other browsers may have to wait a little more before service is available for them and in various languages.

    Getting past the pluses, and they are big one, privacy proponents have based their case against Gmail on two points basically: First, scanning of emails in order to send users relevant sponsored adverts (and unpaid Web page links) related to the content of messages and second, a permanent storage of messages. Targeted text ads are delivered with emails coming to Gmail inbox. They are placed in the emails after automatic scanning through Google’s famous AdSense program – same technology that is used by Google in its search engine to present users with targeted ads when they enter search queries.

    Ads do not seem to be intrusive for now. They do not appear in outgoing emails, so there is no spamming of non subscribers. And they do not come in with each and every email. The first commercials that I noticed in the right margin of my email were of herbal company (no, not distributing Viagra but dealing with other medicines, henna and shampoos) and of a firm that sells world maps. The mail from an environmentalist friend with which I received these ads contained information on Himalayan ecology. I assume that Google system might have ‘assessed’ relevancy of fauna with the herbs that grow in Himalayan Range and machines might have ‘sensed’ my requirement of buying a map to know the area. May be self emailing becomes another effective ways to search the web one day, who knows? I forwarded the same mail to another inbox and the ads were stripped off before it was delivered there. Anyway, who bothers about the ads found every where on the World Wide Web these days. Users have learnt to conveniently ignore them.

    Second objection to the service that is not commissioned yet is to its permanent storage. Gmail Terms of Service reads, "The contents of your Gmail account also are stored and maintained on Google servers in order to provide the service. Indeed, residual copies of email may remain on our systems, even after you have deleted them from your mailbox or after the termination of your account." The idea, according to Google, is to let users to keep their email forever and to provide efficient ways to search for old messages. Some will certainly find it useful whereas for some it may be a turn-off as it is better to forget some things at times.

    How many users need 1 GB storage and how are they going to use it? Google said the storage allotment means that people will never have to delete messages. Despite that an average user may never need that enormous amount of email storage space. When asked, some said that they will make it a repository for any thing they have to store and spare their hard disks.

    Some are looking forward to it to keep MP3 files. Mostly users were relieved that they will not have to delete email to keep the inboxes under limits.

    "Gmail is the best that has happened since we got sliced bread. And they said they will be making improvements all the time," remarked a users in a discussion board comparing Gmail with Spyware – another company that is offering 1GB space along with more facilities. The finding of some discussions by techie communities that I followed are that Spyware may not compete with Google as it is not backed with search and other utilities.

    Those who are using Google since 1998 may remember how it has developed and its services have "stretched into millions of computers" as IT analyst Bill Thompson puts it. If their prudent Gmail beta test phase is any indication then Google might introduce major structural changes in addition to adequately addressing users’ concerns before the service is made available to every one who is interested. Google can learn a lot from the feedback which will primarily come from those Internet savvy fans who have been using services like Hotmail, Yahoo or AOL and who would certainly want to see all familiar features they are used to before they make a decision to shift to Gmail.

    It will be a best add on if Gmail link is built in Google toolbar along with a way to notify of new email arrivals. The option to turn of threading might also help attract more users. The Gmail contact list that opens in a separate window reminds of older days of the web and needs to be made more functional. The best feedback will come from common users so it might be better if Google immediately makes the Beta version available.Personally, I am very much hooked with Gmail, and I find it both useful and very interesting to beta test. Though using an email service is more of a personal preference yet I hope that my elucidation of the service helps users make up their minds before they sign in when it comes.

  4. Gmail by Google

    Google has started testing its free web based email module called Gmail. Amongst privacy debate, the launch appears to have shaken up free web email and advertising market. Analysts say Gmail is not only an expansion of Google business but is also likely to change how people use their email, number one activity on the web.

    I am using Gmail since some email aficionados were offered to give the preview test version of Gmail a whirl. I already am relying on the search box in my inbox even with a small quantity of emails there. It seems to be a simple, powerful and feature-packed email service: 1 gigabyte of emails (eight billion bits, that is 500 times the size of Hotmail and 250 times of Yahoo Mail), keywords (called labels) based email storage and management system, inbox Google search, easy spam reporting and filtering. Emails are threaded in context called conversation and all connected emails can be viewed, one on top of the other, and All Mail users’ personal searchable and permanent email achieve. Advertisements are there but no annoying pop-ups, under-pops or banners.

    The interface is simple and easy but those who have been using Microsoft’s Hotmail and Yahoo Mail and or Outlook will need getting used to it. There are about 20 handy keyboard shortcuts that allow doing everything without lifting the hand from the keyboard, which can be activated and practised. New lingoes like newer and older, expanded all and collapse, conversation and star system look strange in the beginning. Rich and searchable help section is available. Registration is neat; simple.

    Gmail inbox is uncluttered, aesthetic and practical. Along with the subject header, a line in the inbox demonstrates the sender, respondent and the total number of emails represented in particular conversations. Click on that line and see all the replies to a message stacked below the original, making it easy to follow a conversation thread. Next to each message is an indication of when it was sent (two minutes ago, three days ago). Subject is displayed at the top in bold when email opens. By typing in a search query, Gmail explores any sent or received message(s) in an archive, showing entire sequence of email messages related to the conversations.

    Presently, Gmail is in English and only supports Microsoft Internet Explorer, Netscape, and Mozilla browsers. The users of other browsers may have to wait a little more before service is available for them and in various languages.

    Getting past the pluses, and they are big one, privacy proponents have based their case against Gmail on two points basically: First, scanning of emails in order to send users relevant sponsored adverts (and unpaid Web page links) related to the content of messages and second, a permanent storage of messages. Targeted text ads are delivered with emails coming to Gmail inbox. They are placed in the emails after automatic scanning through Google’s famous AdSense program – same technology that is used by Google in its search engine to present users with targeted ads when they enter search queries.

    Ads do not seem to be intrusive for now. They do not appear in outgoing emails, so there is no spamming of non subscribers. And they do not come in with each and every email. The first commercials that I noticed in the right margin of my email were of herbal company (no, not distributing Viagra but dealing with other medicines, henna and shampoos) and of a firm that sells world maps. The mail from an environmentalist friend with which I received these ads contained information on Himalayan ecology. I assume that Google system might have ‘assessed’ relevancy of fauna with the herbs that grow in Himalayan Range and machines might have ‘sensed’ my requirement of buying a map to know the area. May be self emailing becomes another effective ways to search the web one day, who knows? I forwarded the same mail to another inbox and the ads were stripped off before it was delivered there. Anyway, who bothers about the ads found every where on the World Wide Web these days. Users have learnt to conveniently ignore them.

    Second objection to the service that is not commissioned yet is to its permanent storage. Gmail Terms of Service reads, "The contents of your Gmail account also are stored and maintained on Google servers in order to provide the service. Indeed, residual copies of email may remain on our systems, even after you have deleted them from your mailbox or after the termination of your account." The idea, according to Google, is to let users to keep their email forever and to provide efficient ways to search for old messages. Some will certainly find it useful whereas for some it may be a turn-off as it is better to forget some things at times.

    How many users need 1 GB storage and how are they going to use it? Google said the storage allotment means that people will never have to delete messages. Despite that an average user may never need that enormous amount of email storage space. When asked, some said that they will make it a repository for any thing they have to store and spare their hard disks.

    Some are looking forward to it to keep MP3 files. Mostly users were relieved that they will not have to delete email to keep the inboxes under limits.

    "Gmail is the best that has happened since we got sliced bread. And they said they will be making improvements all the time," remarked a users in a discussion board comparing Gmail with Spyware – another company that is offering 1GB space along with more facilities. The finding of some discussions by techie communities that I followed are that Spyware may not compete with Google as it is not backed with search and other utilities.

    Those who are using Google since 1998 may remember how it has developed and its services have "stretched into millions of computers" as IT analyst Bill Thompson puts it. If their prudent Gmail beta test phase is any indication then Google might introduce major structural changes in addition to adequately addressing users’ concerns before the service is made available to every one who is interested. Google can learn a lot from the feedback which will primarily come from those Internet savvy fans who have been using services like Hotmail, Yahoo or AOL and who would certainly want to see all familiar features they are used to before they make a decision to shift to Gmail.

    It will be a best add on if Gmail link is built in Google toolbar along with a way to notify of new email arrivals. The option to turn of threading might also help attract more users. The Gmail contact list that opens in a separate window reminds of older days of the web and needs to be made more functional. The best feedback will come from common users so it might be better if Google immediately makes the Beta version available.Personally, I am very much hooked with Gmail, and I find it both useful and very interesting to beta test. Though using an email service is more of a personal preference yet I hope that my elucidation of the service helps users make up their minds before they sign in when it comes.

  5. can I pls have the username "tox"

    before my brother in silicon valley takes it

    if he, michael toksvig, has taken it ill take

    t0x

    thank you

  6. lach says:

    hotmail sux because you have basicaly no storage, and really lame "welcome" page, and CONSTANT ads to buy the premium version. also, allthe blue makes me sick, and there’s a limit to how many friends i can email at once!

    i’m in line for gmail, and i am a hardcore Yahoo! Plus user.

  7. sachin says:

    How do i register to gmail??

  8. Matt says:

    Hello S. A. J. Shirazi

    People are saying that after about a week, you get 3 invites so you can invite others to use the service. When you get invites, do you think you could share an invite with me?

    My address is matty_c608@msn.com

    Thank you,

    Matt