Accessibility Macros for Visual Studio 2003

As I demo’ed at CSUN, here are the Accessibility Macros for Visual Studio .NET 2003. These macros allow users to tweak the Visual Studio .NET 2003 IDE by easily increasing and decreasing font size, toggling colors in the editor to pure black on white (or vice versa), and maximizing tool windows. I’ve created a GotDotNet workspace for…

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Implementing IAccessible on Custom Controls

Fiona, one of the devs on my team VSCore, has put together a really nice sample on how to implement IAccessible for a Custom Push Button.  If you’re using standard Windows controls, you get MSAA implemented for free.  However, if you’re using custom drawn controls, it is imperative that you implement MSAA (aka IAccessible); otherwise,…

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Active Accessibility and Common Controls

From time to time, I get questions of “Which properties do I need to support for my control?” or “What values do I put for these properties.”  I wrote the MsaaVerify Testing Tool to do this level of testing for you, but from a dev’s perspective, they need to know this information at design time,…

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Testing with Assistive Technologies

In the past, I’ve focused on testing MSAA Properties.  Now we’re ready to take screen reading testing to the next level by adding Events into the algorithm.  It is not only essential that a control support the correct MSAA properties, but it is also essential that the control fire the right event for these properties….

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“Hidden” Keyboard Shortcuts in Visual Studio 2005

I’m calling these keyboard shortcuts “hidden” because they are not bound to any commands, so you won’t be able to find these under Tools – Options – Keyboard.   Keyboard Shortcut To Reach the Command Bar Toolbars   To reach the standard toolbar that 99% of the time lives under the Main Menu, use the…

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MSAA Property Descriptions

Here’s a collective summary of what the different MSAA Properties really mean.   Reference:        http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/msaa/msaaccgd_95kk.asp   IAccessible::get_accName   Every object must have a name.  AccExplorer cannot show “NAMELESS” for this object.  In addition, the AA name needs to be unique for every control on the dialog.   Exceptions: Suppose you had a dialog with…

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