Android and iOS development with C++ in Visual Studio

When it comes to building mobile applications, many developers write most or a part of the apps in C++. Why? Those who are building computationally intensive apps such as games and physics simulations choose C++ for its unparalleled performance, and the others choose C++ for its cross-platform nature and the ability to leverage existing C/C++… Read more

Binary Compatibility and Pain-free Upgrade: Why Moving to Visual Studio 2017 is almost “too easy”

Visual Studio 2017 is a major leap forward in terms of C++ functionality compared with VS 2015. We hope the new release will delight you in your day-to-day job as soon as you can upgrade. This blog post focuses on the steps needed to upgrade from Visual Studio 2015 to 2017. As promised in our… Read more

C++ game development workload in Visual Studio 2017

Visual Studio 2017 introduces a new “Game development with C++” workload, making it easy to get tools you need for building high-quality games with C++. Whether you’re using DirectX or powerful game engines such as Unreal Engine or Cocos2d, Visual Studio can install everything you need all at once to get you started quickly. In… Read more

Visual Studio Code C/C++ extension March 2017 Update

Last week marked an important and exciting milestone for the C/C++ extension for Visual Studio Code: this extension has been installed for over 1 million times since it shipped just a year ago! Thanks to everyone who tried it and provided us invaluable feedback to help shape the extension what it is today. But we… Read more

Using C++ Resumable Functions with Libuv

Previously on this blog we have talked about Resumable Functions, and even recently we touched on the renaming of the yield keyword to co_yield in our implementation in Visual Studio 2017. I am very excited about this potential C++ standards feature, so in this blog post I wanted to share with you a real world… Read more

`yield` keyword to become `co_yield` in VS 2017

Coroutines—formerly known as “C++ resumable functions”—are one of the Technical Specifications (TS) that we have implemented in the Visual C++ compiler. We’ve supported coroutines for three years—ever since the VC++ November 2013 CTP release. If you’re using coroutines you should be aware that the keyword `yield` is being removed in the release of VS 2017…. Read more

CMake support in Visual Studio 2017 – what’s new in the RC.2 update

In case you missed the latest Visual Studio news, there is a new update for Visual Studio 2017 RC available. You can either upgrade your existing installation or, if you’re starting fresh, install it from the Visual Studio 2017 RC download page. This release comes with several enhancements in Visual Studio’s CMake experience that further… Read more

Open any folder with C++ sources in Visual Studio 2017 RC

With the Visual Studio 2017 RC release, we’re continuing to improve the “Open Folder” capabilities for C++ source code. In this release, we’re adding support for building as well as easier configuration for the debugger and the C++ language services. If you are just getting started with “Open Folder” or want to read about these… Read more

CMake support in Visual Studio – the Visual Studio 2017 RC update

Visual Studio 2017 RC is an important release when it comes to its support for CMake. The “Tools for CMake” VS component is now ready for public preview and we’d like to invite all of you to bring your CMake projects into VS and give us feedback on your experience. For an overview of the… Read more

C++/WinRT Available on GitHub

C++/WinRT is now available on GitHub. This is the future of the Modern C++ project and the first public preview coming officially from Microsoft. https://github.com/microsoft/cppwinrt C++/WinRT is a standard C++ language projection for the Windows Runtime implemented solely in header files. It allows you to both author and consume Windows Runtime APIs using any standards-compliant… Read more