Notes from the PDC – Day 2 (Windows Workflow Foundation)


Back in the mid-1990’s, a very good friend of mine left the software company we both worked for and founded a company dedicated to developing software solutions for dental/ortho offices. The idea he had then was a bit revolutionary at the time for a PC-based system. Along with a doctor-friend of his, they set out to design a complete “workflow” enabled system that would walk an attending physician/assistant through the entire process of taking care of a patient. This included signing the patient in, taking the necessary photos of the patients mouth (the system interfaced to the cameras and x-ray machines), performing the necessary work on the patient, all the way through to the point of patient check-out.

As you can imagine, this system was quite complex and took many months to build even the first version. However, once completed, it was a huge success with dentist/ortho offices around the country and now my friend is a very wealthy and basically retired individual.


Workflow-based systems such as this are now much easier than ever to design and build with the product we announced yesterday at the PDC – Windows Workflow Foundation. Using the Windows Workflow Foundation, architects and developers can engineer and implement complex systems that execute a wide variety of stateful, long-running, persistent workflow applications that includes both computer-based as well as user-based actions. For more information, I would recommend reading the following whitepapers and articles:


 

Comments (7)

  1. Paul Watson says:

    Ah excellent, you found the comment option 🙂

    WWF (I just noticed the acronym) looks very decent. Something we need; "stateful, long-running, persistent workflow applications".

  2. Marc Clifton says:

    Workflows have been the core of my development suite for the last 10 years, and a core element in the MyXaml / declarative programming toolchest. It’s nice to see Microsoft finally recognizing this and providing some tools for developers. I’m concerned that the implementation is a bit heavy though. I was particularly concerned in the example that I saw, that left it up to the application to load the assembly containing the workflow.

    In many ways, a workflow framework is very simple to implement, so I’ll be curious to get a better understanding of Microsoft’s vision of the concept.

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  6. ephedra says:

    In many ways, a workflow framework is very simple to implement, so I’ll be curious to get a better understanding of Microsoft’s vision of the concept.