Podcast definition provided by Mac sales rep


While browsing the U-Village this weeked with my wife and babe, I begged by wife to let me have a few minutes in the Mac store. (Heck, a man’s got to stay on top of the competition, correct?) My real purpose was to get an overview of the iPod so that I could compare it to the new Creative Zen Micro that the lovely Diane Blumenshine (another Softie) had been raving about to me. I asked the sales rep (a young lad who looked like I might have run into at the nearby University of Washington) about Podcasting and it’s true meaning. In a plastic shell (as opposed to a nutshell), he said that that a Podcast was merely an audio file of a discussion or newsprogram, rather than music audio. What about the projecting of music over FM? Is that Podcasting? Nope. Apparently that’s something else that you can do but it’s not a Mac affiliated feature. Interesting… just the other day I heard a local DJ talking about “Podcasting one’s music collection over FM”. FMcasting?


Comments (4)

  1. barrkel says:

    You can get a low-power FM transmitter attachment for an iPod that can be picked up by a car radio. Maybe he was talking about that.

    Normally, a podcast is a recorded piece of audio that is distributed by being referenced in an RSS stream. It could be music, or talk, but generally is longer-lived and slightly less topical than, say, a live radio show (whether it be talk radio or music radio).

  2. jaywaltm says:

    Sweet, just found a definition floating around here at MS, posted by Mike Hall:

    http://www.microsoft.com/events/teched2005/podcast.mspx

    "A podcast is an audio or video file that you can subscribe to online. The advantage to a podcast is that you don’t need to remember to go back and get the newest information from your favorite online source. Once you subscribe to the podcast it will automatically show up in your reader. The readers are usually free or low cost. The majority of podcasts are available as audio files in MP3 format, syndicated through an RSS (XML) file. Other formats and other types of files, such as video, can also be podcasted. The content is downloaded to your desktop PC or mobile device. It’s not streamed, so you can access the content when you want."

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