The Atlantic Microsoft DSL Tools Zoo


I’m just back from a very pleasant holiday, which partially explains my recent blogging silence.


At http://www.eclipse.org/gmt/am3/zoos/atlanticDSLToolsZoo/ I found 113 domain models generated using the Atlas Transformation Language.  This is a good way to promote interoperability between tools.  Thanks to Jean Bézivin.

Comments (1)

  1. I think the world is possibly moving faster than I can keep up with. About 14 months ago (more or less) I started looking at MS DSL, having been using UML for about 8 years. I think may even have posed a few questions to you about this time (as "quest in time")

    One thing I speculated on was that if I waited long enough there would be a transformation from UML (XMI) to DSL that would allow my analysts to work in abstract UML and my developers in concrete VS DSL.

    Since then I have had to make my purchasing decisions and went for Rational XDE for analysis modelling and left my developers with VS 2003.

    In the last 3-4 months its become clear that IBM are putting increasing emphasis on eclipse based Software Modeller, and I’m in the throws of upgrading all my developers to VS2005 professional.

    Having reviewed Software Modeller it’s a much better tool that XDE but does not feature .NET language generation. It also has the problem of not being compatable with SourceSafe and I’m not sure I can deal with yet another parallel source code control system.

    Having followed the links to this posting however, do my eyes decieve me or is ATL the means by which I might soon be able to tranform from Software Modeller based UML in eclipse to VS2005 DSL’s.  

    I think I might also be seeing a fundamental shift in the development tools industry away from protectionism and towards interoperability. If so then the next few years could see advances in software development that we have only been able to dream at for the last 20 years, and I might as well resign myself to management now as I’m going to be too old for all the excitement.

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