Visual Studio 2005 SP1 Beta and Visual Studio support for Vista


Today, I’m pleased to announce the availability of the beta of Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1.


Based on your feedback, Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 addresses issues that were found through a combination of customer reports, MSDN Product Feedback Center and internal testing.  I know that this Service Pack is a little late in coming.  While I regret that it took longer, we wanted to be as thorough as possible about taking your feedback and decided to take the extra time.  You can find a technical description of some of the fixes included in this service pack and download the beta by registering on the Microsoft Connect Site.  We’ll have the complete list of fixes posted when the service pack releases.  Pending feedback from you on this beta, our plan is to ship the final version in the next 3-4 months. 


The second thing that I’d like to discuss is our support for Windows Vista, which is due to release in the coming months.  Ensuring that VS2005 works well on Windows Vista is a core goal of ours.  Visual Studio 2005 SP1 will run on Vista but will likely have a few compatibility issues.  We are working with the Vista team to understand those, to provide workarounds where possible and also work on providing you with a set of fixes beyond SP1.  We had a choice to make internally – hold up VS 2005 SP1 till we get the fixes in or decouple and ship VS 2005 SP1 as soon as possible knowing that we have to provide fixes for some of those Vista compatibility issues later.  Based on your feedback of having SP1 for VS 2005 soon, we decided to separate the two.  Visual Studio 2005, with its support for the .NET Framework 2.0 and add-ins to support the .NET Framework 3.0, Windows Vista, and the 2007 Microsoft Office system, provides a first-class development experience for developers.


As I’ve mentioned previously, Windows Vista will ship with the .NET Framework 3.0 pre-installed.   We’re also testing to ensure that your .NET Framework 1.1 and 2.0 applications will work on Windows Vista so that your existing applications will continue to run as expected.  However, we will not support Visual Studio .NET 2002 or Visual Studio .NET 2003 as development environments on Windows Vista.  You can continue to use Visual Studio .NET 2002 or 2003 on Windows XP to develop applications that can run on Windows Vista.  Given the customer feedback that we’ve received since the launch of Visual Studio 2005 indicating the manageability of upgrading from Visual Studio .NET 2003 to Visual Studio 2005, we are focusing our efforts on ensuring VS 2005 is a great development platform for Vista.


Previously we announced our support for ensuring the Visual Basic 6.0 runtime and IDE on Windows Vista and we are on track for delivering that support.


Namaste!

Comments (223)

  1. Rob Caron says:

    Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 Beta is now available for download. There’s a lot of stuff in this…

  2. Microsoft Corporate VP S. “Soma” Somasegar has the news at his weblog:

  3. Beta of this is up on connect, details from Somasegar.Vista compat is great to hear, it will be interesting

  4. Buck Hodges says:

    For Team Build users, I’ll spare you the suspense and tell you that there are no meaningful changes in…

  5. dhopton says:

    What sort of issues can we expect on vista? Are you flat out telling me I can’t start the IDE, or are you mearly suggesting that I’m gonna have some non-admin issues. I’ve not seen anything when running as non-admin on XP, nor have I seen any significant issues runnign VS2005 on Vista.

  6. G.T. says:

    I am glad the sp1 is there, vs 2005 works under vista with no problems with a very large c# / web / windows forms solution, and I hope the sp1 improves the overall vs 2005 performance and ability to handle large solutions.

  7. B# .NET Blog says:

    Rather unexpectedly, the availability of a SP1 beta for Visual Studio 2005 was announced today by soma….

  8. Visual Studio support on Vista: doubts revealed

  9. Yes, very much anticipated VS2005 SP1 Beta is available through Microsoft Connect . If you signed up

  10. David Taylor says:

    Somasegar, thanks for this…but it would be helpful if you could answer a few simple questions.

    1) Will VS 2005 already run fine on Vista (without SP1) with UAC protection disabled and using an admin account?  If not what areas have problems?

    You say that VS 2003 will not be supported.  I am find with that, as you should focus on the future, but:

    2) Will VS 2003 run on Vista with UAC protection disabled and using an admin account?  If not what areas have problems, or doesnt it even load?

    Thanks,

    David

  11. The beta for Visual Studio 2005 SP1 is available now at Microsoft Connect.  If you’ve been a user…

  12. Thomas Lee says:

    I’m just a little confused with the messaging here. Soma says that VS 2005 will work on Vista but will likely have compatibility issues and that the VS team are working with the Vista team to ‘understand’ those and to find work arounds.

    Gee – Vista has been 5 years in the making, and VS has been around for a while. And just a few weeks before Vista should RTM these issues should be nailed. Or is Vista a surprise to the VS team (and vice versa).

    My immediate take is that if VS is not going to work on Vista, how bad is the App Compat going to be.

    I agree that the VS team should not be slipping to accomotate this. But Vista sure as heck should be able to support apps like VS – and if that means slipping Vista again, then so be it. Especiallly as VS 2002/2003 are not to be supported.

    Posts like this make me even more nervous about Vista. While I’m sure it wasn’t Soma’s intention, it’s just more proof that corporates need to wait for SP1.

  13. As announced on Soma’s blog, Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 Beta is available today. You can sign…

  14. VS 2005 SP1 Beta is now available for our device customers. This is a significant release for Visual…

  15. AndrewSven says:

    I’m glad to see that you are not following the VS2003 SP scheduling.

    Any fix for current systems that can be safely released now should be.

    Vista (like any new system) will bring some issues to the table; the idea of waiting for Vista to fix current systems makes me think bad things.

  16. I can hardly wait to dig into these things which I have long anticipated and greatly need… bravo  WIT…

  17. Mike Dimmick says:

    " However, we will not support Visual Studio .NET 2002 or Visual Studio .NET 2003 as development environments on Windows Vista."

    This is in direct contravention of your support lifecycle policy and is unacceptable.

  18. Seeing that the support for VS2003 will not be present on Vista is a bit worried for us. We’ve lots of large customers that works with .NET 1.1 applications and surely they will not be ready for a migration soon. In second, we work a lot on the Dynamics platform, and here .NET 1.1 is he standard.

    Should we plan to have a machine with Vista and a machine with XP? Not so good… By doing this, you’ll see that XP will be the main platform for a lot of time.

  19. AndrewSeven says:

    While being able to to use VS 2003 is not important to me, building 2.0 apps is.

    Will I be able to build C#/CLI/CLR 2.0 apps (with VS) without have intererence from the 3.0 (former WinFx) extensions so that the apps can run on all systems supporting 2.0

  20. ctodx says:

    Some interesting news appeared on Somasegar’s blog this morning (in essence, he’s in charge of devdiv…

  21. Daniel Moth says:

    Support for development IDEs on Vista

  22. Amit Bahree says:

    I have to agree with Thoma’s comments above. Sorry I am going to be critical.

    Somasegar, this just confuses people more and does not help at all. Why is that your flag ship dev product does not work well enough with your flag ship brand new OS? Were you taken by surprise?

    So for those who work for in the industry, what are we supposed to say to our clients? Oh sorry, we cannot do anything on Vista right now since we don’t have a fully supported dev suite? So, why should we use either of the products? Hmmm ….

    Also, not just stating VS.NET 2003 will not work, does not cut it. Is it a ploy to get people to upgrade to VS.NET 2005 (assuming it will work at some  point)?

    Dare I even ask about TFS and VSTS and Vista (given there are so many issues with it on XP). I suppose no hotfixes can be released to get this fixed?

    Eagerly awaiting replies.

  23. Disappointed says:

    It is too bad that we had to wait this long to get the product we should have had on the release date.

    The bottom line is that VS2005 was not ready when it was released.  Not even close.  This has cost me countless hours of productivity.  Let’s not even talk about my stress level.  I’m on a project with a rigid release date and using VS2005 before SP1 was a huge mistake.  This is based on various bugs I’ve experienced which have been mentioned in numerous newsgroups.

    http://www.microsoftweblog.com/2005/11/05/problems-with-visual-studio-2005/

    And now by not supporting 2003 on Vista, you force us to upgrade to this product?

    Please learn from your mistakes here Microsoft; do not pack Orcas with features that will make you rush out another premature product.  It should be more like SQL05, which runs flawlessly.  More beta testing is an absolute must, with realistic test projects and solutions.  If you repeat your mistakes we will all be learning Java soon because the developer market won’t put up with this.

  24. My VSTS Blog says:

    The first post I noticed this morning with the good news was Brian Harry’s " TFS SP1 Beta is available!!!

  25. Good News =9 says:

    Woww Great news !!

    I hope that this resolve some performance issues also, because the VS2005 is killing me in production environments with more than 50.000 lines of code =(

    "Based on your feedback of having SP1 for VS 2005 soon, we decided to separate the two.  Visual Studio 2005, with its support for the .NET Framework 2.0 and add-ins to support the .NET Framework 3.0, Windows Vista, and the 2007 Microsoft Office system, provides a first-class development experience for developers"

    This show the names problems that you generate in the cummunity !!,

    "and add-ins to support the .NET Framework 3.0, Windows Vista"

    .NET 3.0 is the WinVista addons so don’t call it 3.0 but that is an old history that generates a lot of disappoint in the community and you know that.

    Bad for that, I was loving the new MS way but now, I realize that the marketing is again here playing a very hard rol in the game. Because this time the others environments are evolving in the right way, while you are trying to sell things fast instead of focus on what you sell.

    I love .NET 1.1, I love .NET 2.0, I love the future C# 3.0 but please stop doing new buggy versions or all the people that comes from the JAva world, will come back to it if .NET become buggy like now.

    Just a real case, some time ago I release a program to a customer, and some days later he call me and said:

    "Have you read the mails ?"

    – What mails

    "The mails from your program"

    – But the program don’t send mails !!!

    "time by time the program hangs up and show a pop up that saids:

        The program do an ilegal operation

            Send Report to Microsoft (button)

    I cant belive it my program sending mails to MS.. this are problem in the framework right ???

    Anyway …. good news

  26. Today the Visual Studio 2005 team released Service Pack 1 Beta. Included in the beta is the new linker…

  27. .Avery Blog says:

    Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 Beta

  28. One of the recurring questions I got at TechEd, was when will we be releasing the Service Pack for Visual…

  29. I’m contractually obligated (the support guy) to let you know that SP1 *beta* for Visual Studio 2005…

  30. Visual Studio 2005 SP1 Betaでました。

  31. Big news today was the release of beta’s of a couple of key items.  Both of these are very…

  32. me says:

    Thank you for the update.

    I have been waiting a long time for SP1.

    VS2005 was so buggy that I decided to wait until SP1 was released. That will essentially be the real release date for me.

    I am not concerned about Vista compatability at this time.

    I’m waiting for Vista SP1 first, so you will have time to resolve those issues.

  33. Somasegar’s WebLog Visual Studio 2005 SP1 Beta and Visual Studio support for Vista 오늘 VS2005 SP1 베타 공개와…

  34. Sarath says:

    Why a beta release of Service Pack?

  35. I was briefed earlier today on Visual Studio support on Windows Vista, and I wanted to clear the air……

  36. I was briefed earlier today on Visual Studio support on Windows Vista, and I wanted to clear the air……

  37. S. Somasegar, le patron de la division développeur à Redmond vient d’annoncer la disponibilité du service…

  38. ping pong says:

    VS.Net 2003 not supported? This is beyond the belief. Or maybe not, after seeing the quality of 2005 edition.

    What about the eVC IDEs?

  39. ping pong says:

    One more thing: it feels like developer division – like the OS division before – felt victim of marketing hype surrounding .NET. Somehow you started to believe that using managed code will yield better software faster. During 6 years since .NET was wrapped off, we had the Longhorn fiasco, and now this. Since the 6.0 IDE will be supported, the only reason for lack of VS.Net 2003 support is the fact that it contains managed components.

  40. interscape says:

    Ping pong, Managed code is not the reason why VS2003 can’t be supported. In fact, VS2003 is mostly unmanaged code. VS2005 has significantly more managed code than 2003.

  41. Dwayne J. Baldwin says:

    The first thing you folks on Visual Studio 2005 team can do is release SP1 that is NOT beta. Next you can start working on SP2 (to be released in 3-4 months) that will work with Vista.

    It is a complete joke when you just released SP1 for VS2003, then you announce .NET 3.0 and now you tell us VS2003 won’t work with Vista.

    Most of us VS2005 supporters are still waiting to simply compile large projects. Web Site Projects (WSP) and Web Application Projects (WAP) are just other examples of incompetence when all you have to do is listen to Visual Studio developers.

    Thanks for the trivial effort to release SP1 beta. If you want to win the next election you had better get your act together soon. Java is written all over this fiasco of versions.

  42. Somasegar posted some details on his blog concerning Vista support for different versions of the Visual

  43. I'm going to jump on the "I'm outraged" bandwagon and blog my disappointment, yet again,

  44. Wilson Loo says:

    I really think this is quite unacceptable for a software giant like Microsoft. I truly understand Microsoft’s point about Vista’s features – Aero, UAC, etc… but not having backward-compatibility for developers is akin to Java’s long-standing incompatibility between their JDK versions.

    1. Visual Studio .NET 2003 is a product that was out 2+ years ago. Many of our customers, partners and vendors still rely on it. Not supporting VS 2003 and/or .NET 1.1 is harshly forcing everyone to upgrade to 2005 version. Many IT Departments and CTOs are unable to justify the upgrade in such a short span of time.

    2. Visual Studio .NET 2003, being such a relatively new release is still under the full support cycle which means Microsoft should honour its commitment to the future of the technology. While having an "ideal case" would be good where everyone is on Vista, running with Aero support, having UAC control, etc… this is not the case in real world.

    I certainly hope Microsoft will review this decision.

  45. KG2V says:

    Great move Microsoft.  I’ve been a developer with Microsoft products since the early 1990s, and started using Windows with Windows 286

    Moves like this are why I’m seriously hoping that someone comes up with a good RAD tool for Linux, so I can leave this behind.

    Used to hate Linux – but it’s these bone-headed moves that make me see that we must have some real choice

  46. So first most of the meat was taken out of Vista, and the best of what remains (the poorly named .NET

  47. De Corporate Vice President, Developer Division, S. "Soma" Somasegar heeft op zijn weblog de komst van

  48. ping pong says:

    Interscape, so what actually makes VB6 (released in 1998) run on Vista, while VS2003 is left behind?

    To Microsoft: maybe you should stop worrying about Orcas and next releases, because your installed base is going to shrink significantly if you don’t support previous IDEs on Vista. Given your recent history, fluff like "we’re going to focus on delivering great experience with [insert codename here]" doesn’t cut it anymore.

  49. Tim Weaver says:

    It looks like Visual Studio 2005 and Vista will not be fully compatible. In addition VS 2003 will not…

  50. Andy B says:

    " However, we will not support Visual Studio .NET 2002 or Visual Studio .NET 2003 as development environments on Windows Vista."

    That sucks. Big time!

    But I guess you know that, already, don’t you?

  51. Why does it take Microsoft longer to release a service pack than it take most companies to release a…

  52. Soma announced today that beta 1 of Visual Studio 2005 SP1 is out.  Looking forward to this, although…

  53. ברגעים אלה, קראתי את מה שנכתב במספר בלוגים [לינקים שונים] לגבי התמיכה של כלי פיתוח ב Windows Vista. בסופו…

  54. Halo_Four says:

    I’m sorry; this is completely and totally unacceptable.  If you’re telling me that a major fundamental Microsoft product slated to be released in a matter of months can’t execute other fundamental Microsoft products then you have a serious, serious problem.

    If it is to be the case then Vista shouldn’t be delayed; it should be scrapped entirely.  Honestly, way too much time was taken and the product is beyond underwhelming.  If on top of that it is incapable of running first-party applications which are still well within their product support lifecycle then the OS is totally useless and will shape up to be the next Windows Millennium Edition, and if you don’t understand how much of an insult that is intended to be then you have a serious disconnect from reality.  Moreso, what does that mean for third-party applications?

    Microsoft products, which I generally prefer, are popular for two reasons:  general support for a wide array of current and legacy software, and wide support for the development community.  In one fell swoop Microsoft is proposing to stop both.  This is a lose/lose situation for all of those who are involved.

    And no, I’m not some anti-Microsoft zealot.  I do not have an account on Slashdot.  I am writing this on my primary development machine which has four different versions of Visual Studio installed on it simultaneously.  I am surrounded by five machines all running Windows exclusively.  My many cases of DVDs for my MSDN Team Edition for Software Developers are sitting in the bookshelf behind me.  I am an operator on several IRC channels on the Eris Free Network related to Microsoft technologies.  I am an apologist in every sense of the word and openly defend Microsoft even in the most ridiculous of circumstances.  But these actions are indefensible and actively threaten my livelihood, which is currently dependent on the ability of my company to develop and support our products based on Microsoft platforms dating back to the ancient and unsupportable times of the late 1990s.

    I implore you to take these issues into deep consideration and to share my rant with all those who have the slightest amount of influence.  The success of a great many companies rests on the Microsoft platform.  Instability of the offerings of that platform is not an option.

  55. Somasegar’s MSDN Blog has details for the Visual Studio 2005 SP1 Beta download (available from the…

  56. Halo_Four says:

    P.S.  I’d just like to add that it is my opinion that if Visual Studio 2005 requires a service pack and the previous versions of Visual Studio become unsupported then it is an egregious failing on the part of the Operating Systems division at Microsoft.  There is absolutely no reason that the new operating system cannot support all previous applications save those which rely on explicitly insecure legacy, and if recent Microsoft products also fit into that category then we have an even bigger problem than I had originally thought.

  57. TSchissler says:

    So to all critics abov, I’d like to mention, that I don’t agree with you. The only reason for me using VS 2003 is if you have old projects and you don’t want to migrate them to VS 2005 (which you should consider). For every other case I can’t understand anybody still using VS 2003, VS 2005 is so much more productive.

    And who forces you to use vista? If you use a old Development envirionment why not using XP for a while? I plan to continue using Xp on my production machine for the next vew month even I use VS 2005.

  58. Hello says:

    One thing solves all: start-run secpol.msc and just remove the crap they call UAC.  

    I’ve got everything, including VC 6.0, VS 2002, VS 2003, and VS 2005 all running side-by-side on Vista RC1.  I’ve even got the Vista SDK running with VC 6.0, something they said was impossible.

    Developers do not need UAC. Period.

  59. ping pong says:

    @TSchissler:

    We provide compiled binaries for use with different versions of Visual Studio (I have VC6, VS 2003, VS 2005, eVC3 and eVC4 installed). As long as our customers do not migrate to bug-ridden VS 2005, switching is not an option (and I hate to tell you that VS 2005 adoption rate among them is rather low).

    Nobody forces us to use Vista, and as a matter of fact we won’t use it as long as MS doesn’t provide support for IDEs (which probably means never.)

    And no, we don’t care much for managed code.

    > For every other case I can’t understand anybody

    > still using VS 2003, VS 2005 is so much more

    > productive.

    Yep, especially when it hangs or crashes.

  60. The Good News is that we have Service Pack 1 for Visual Studio available in Beta (so you are on your own with that :>).  The bad news is that Visual Studio 2005 will only work, and then with specific problems.  Somasegar expalins this a little bit

  61.  There was an announcement made this week about Visual Studio 2005 SP1 and support for Vista. In a nutshell,…

  62.  There was an announcement made this week about Visual Studio 2005 SP1 and support for Vista. In a nutshell,…

  63. Mike Dimmick says:

    TSchissler:

    Upgrading a project to a different development environment and different compilers is an extensive and _expensive_ process requiring full revalidation of all software. We are (primarily) a contract development company, with six developers. We give fixed-price quotes to our customers, and you can believe that they will either postpone or cancel the work, or find a different contractor, if the quote is inflated by having to change tools. It’s a case of reducing the risk.

    At work I have seven different C/C++ compilers installed: Microsoft C 6.0, Visual C++ 1.52, eVC 3.0, eVC 4.0, Visual Studio 6.0, Visual Studio .NET 2003 and Visual Studio 2005. I need all of these tools: C 6.0 and Visual C++ 1.52 for DOS development for Symbol Series 3000 (to support existing applications), eVC 3.0 for Pocket PC 2002 deployments, eVC 4.0 for Windows CE (Symbol MC3000 mainly) and Pocket PC 2003 deployments, VS 6.0 for desktop components (especially our application server, written in VB 6, and based entirely on COM plugins so don’t think of suggesting an upgrade to .NET), and VS 2003 and 2005 for some C++ and .NET desktop components and .NET Compact Framework, 1.0 and 2.0 applications.

    All these tools must continue to work in order for my company to upgrade to Vista. This decision prevents that upgrade.

  64. Guys, have you heard about Delphi? (or C#, C++, the DTG way)

    We can compile form WIN32 to .Net with very few changes, our previous and new delphi versions work with almost no issues in Vista.

    Backwards compatilibity had been and IS for Delphi a MAJOR concern, we will burn alive Borland if they do to us what MS did with VB and VB.Net then to .Net 1.1 vs Net 2.0  and now to VS2002 and VS2003.

    Give it a shot, for free. http://www.turboexplorer.com

  65. Wictor Wilen says:

    Windows Vista will be released later this year to partners and volume license customers and in the beginning of 2007 to the masses. A successful release of a software product such as Windows Vista req…

  66. The Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 Beta has just been released.  Here’s the official announcement. …

  67. Tim Weaver says:

    Soma has the details here He doesn’t actually say VS 2003 will never be supported, but out of the box

  68. The announcement of the beta of SP1 for Vista on somasegar’s blog here seems to have caused some consternation since they’re saying they need a new service pack for Vista and VS2003 won’t be supported.The truth is a bit more mixed than that as Scott Guth

  69. an ex Microsoft FAN !! says:

    TSchissler:

    what do you said ?

    > For every other case I can’t understand anybody

    > still using VS 2003, VS 2005 is so much more

    > productive.

    We port a big project of more than 250.000 lines of code and the program become very unstable, and i don’t talk about VS, the framework generates random errors and show a pop up to send errors to MS !!!

    we are NOT MORE PRODUCTIVE WITH VS2005

    WE ARE MORE PRODUCTIVE WITH VS2005

    The reason: VS2005 hang ups all the time for us we are working with a big VB.NET application, with a lot of inherited forms and they don’t work very well, you can see it in the kb.

    The edit and continue simply don’t work for us !!!

    do you call it more productive ???

    I love .NET 1.1 I love even more .NET 2.0, but is very hard to me to see how MS is taking this problem, releasing a SP one year later, asking us to call to the support to get more than 20 hot fixes !!!

    They preffer to think in the very bad new name for the WinFx and things like that !!

    I was a big Microsoft fun !! I fight with friend to defend the M$ position, but this is too much for me !! they simple seams to don’t here any more !!!

    They only hear us while they want the all the delphi and Java people jump into the .NET world !!

    But now they only see to the future and worry about us, they said:

    Wait to the the Q3 2006 we send all our all people to the WinVista team, and we can release the SP before !!!

    PLease Bill no go for the MS, give all your employers a lesson of customer care and satisfaction

    Cheers

  70. S. Somasegar has a post on his blog about Visual Studio 2002/2003 not being supported on Windows Vista…

  71. S. Somasegar has a post on his blog about the delay in the release of VS 2005 SP1 (it was due in Q3 2006…

  72. avidgator says:

    Simply put, this will have a pretty serious chilling effect concerning the adoption of Vista for my team and our customers.  It is disturbing to hear this degree of uncertianty concerning the ability of 2.0-based applications to run successfully and without issue on Vista.  Now we either freeze our customers and their OS pruchases on XP or must plan for the possibility of patch releases merely to support the new OS.  Very disapointing.

    It also is a circumstance that is very difficult to reconcile with the Allchin letter you referenced in your 9/15 post.  Mr. Allchin’s statement that "You have GOT to be ready for this opportunity" sounds like it is being followed by a MIcrosoft parenthetical that reads "because we certainly are not."

  73. Visual Studio の Windows Vista サポート

  74. Kevin Jensen says:

    I still can’t find the release notes?  Anyone have any luck?

  75. If you’re a developer today writing .NET apps, you’re either writing them with Visual Studio

  76. Somasegar says:

    There have been some questions on run-time compatibility.  I want to reiterate that .NET Framework 1.1 and .NET Framework 2.0 applications will continue to work as expected on Windows Vista.

    – somasegar

  77. Dennis' Blog says:

    When you think hundreds of weblogs are going to blog about the new release of Windows Live Writer, Somasegar

  78. Dennis' Blog says:

    When you think hundreds of weblogs are going to blog about the new release of Windows Live Writer, Somasegar

  79. Mike says:

    I think this was told by developers to Microsoft MANY times! Stop calling WinFx as .NETFW3.0!

    It’s a mess when seeing Microsoft renaming and how products are versioned. It’s BIG MESS and this upsets developers because this makes troubles to them when they have to explain this to their clients.

    So stop to haze .net developers with this naming mess, or event your comunnity will get very agry to microsoft.

  80. "Soma" Somasegar , Corporate Vice President Developer Division určitě mnoho lidí svým oznámením nepotěšil.

  81. Found on LonghornBlogs this interesting post from Robert Law…

    {

    I was briefed earlier today on Visual…

  82. Dennis Ecclestone says:

    The release notes for Visual Studio 2003 .NET SP1 (

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;924009) list Windows Vista as a supported operating system.  Obviously there’s not a whole lot of testing that goes into this sort of thing.

  83. I can’t believe it’s going to take 3-4 months to release VS2005 SP1. That just seems absolutely absurd to me, especially after waiting for so long to have some of these VS2005 annoyances resolved.

    Listen, Somasegar, I mean no disrespect, but something has to change here. MS must get into a position where it can release service packs to Visual Studio within a reasonable amount of time; take smaller bites if you need to. It’s difficult for me to believe that Microsoft, of all companies, cannot accelerate this time frame.

    And like the others, I think the decision not to support VS2003 on Vista is a big mistake. But then I thought that calling WinFX ".NET 3.0" was a mistake, too.

  84. Kurbli says:

    Found on LonghornBlogs this interesting post from Robert Law … { I was briefed earlier today on Visual

  85. Check out Somasegar’s announcement on Visual Studio 2005 SP1 and Visual Studio Support for Vista. There…

  86. Check out Somasegar’s announcement on Visual Studio 2005 SP1 beta and Visual Studio Support…

  87. GuyIncognito says:

    Scrap Vista and start over!  You guys at Microsoft have surely jumped the shark on Vista.  I’m shortly celebrating the 5th anniversary of the release of the public Vista bits without a release.  If I were in your position at my job, I surely would have been fired already.

    And now the announcement that VS.NET 2003 SP1 will not run on Vista?!?  You’ve got to be kidding!  (Checking calendar — Nope not April 1st…)

    Thankfully prices are dropping on Intel Macs.   Mass Exodus to Macs/Linux, MySQL, Rails, Java, etc?

    Whatever happened to Developers, Developers, Developers???

  88. DaveF says:

    So after years of telling clients to upgrade their VB6 apps to .net I’ve now got to tell them that if they want to maintain their .net 1.1 apps on Vista, they’ve got to upgrade them to .net 2? (With a new, more expensive version of VS which doesn’t work right on Vista yet).

    Or, they could just dig out the old VB6 source code, because that’s supported…

    Nice move Microsoft. Not. (dot net? or dot not?)

  89. Somasegar’s WebLog always with big announcement. He is announcing the Service Pack 1 of Visual Studio

  90. Aaron King says:

    I downloaded it VS2005 SP1 Beta tried to install it on 3 different machines.  Tried the workarounds from the Connect forums.  Downloaded the release notes.  Tried those workarounds.  Still no go.  

    I’d love to see improvements in VS2005, I guess I’ll have to wait until Beta2.  I hate being a Beta tester.

  91. Long time no see, I've been very busy at work, so this is my first post for a while. Soma blogs about

  92. Lack of support for running VS 2003 will be a show stopper for me.  I will not convert my main work PC to Vista, absent support for VS 2003 (which continues to be used by a large number of my clients).

  93. Ha comenzado a generar algo de noticias el post de Somasegar acerca del soporte que Microsoft tendrá…

  94. Nazul# says:

    Ha comenzado a generar algo de noticias el post de Somasegar acerca del soporte que Microsoft tendrá…

  95. Nazul# says:

    Al parecer el soporte de Visual Studio en Windows Vista no será como se esperaría.

  96. Al parecer el soporte de Visual Studio en Windows Vista no será como se esperaría.

  97. Al parecer el soporte de Visual Studio en Windows Vista no será como se esperaría.

  98. I’m not sure how to interpret the following quote in the blog.

    “Given the customer feedback that we’ve received since the launch of Visual Studio 2005 indicating the manageability of upgrading from Visual Studio .NET 2003 to Visual Studio 2005, we are focusing our efforts on ensuring VS 2005 is a great development platform for Vista.”

    Having been through a mid size windows forms (170K lines of code) upgrade from vs2003 to vs2005 and experienced the significant pain that migration caused us.  Once your solution grows beyond a certain size the IDE slows down to a crawl on a high end Laptop that was a 5 months old.  Dare I say it, but VS2005 and Vista in combination would require significant CPU/RAM to allow a developer to operate productively.  If you really want pain, try working in a mixed DPI scenario, 120 vs 96 dpi and see how to cause a development team tears every day at code checkin/out.  

    Our companies experience migrating VS2003 web applications to VS2005 was a total re-write to help incorporate master forms. Oh and the fact I got totally lost on where the files in a VS2005 project actually reside.

    Finally, all I can say is that we have been burnt in the past with Microsoft and upgrades, so this stands as nothing new for me.  Stay away from version 1 or 2 products from Microsoft because it generally takes them a few versions to iron out all the problems, mainly at our (developers/customers) expense.

  99. Bruce DaCosta says:

    The correct url location for the VS 2005 Service Pack 1 Beta release notes is below.

    ——

    The VS 2005 Service Pack 1 Beta Release notes can be found at the url below.  You don’t have to log into the connect site to access the release notes.

    http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/Downloads/DownloadDetails.aspx?DownloadID=3249

    Thanks for testing the beta service pack

    Bruce

    Thanks for testing the beta service pack

    Bruce

  100. Welcome to the fifth Community Convergence update. This file is published on my blog, and shortly thereafter…

  101. Microsoft ha liberado el Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 (SP1) Beta, el cual incorpora los ‘fixes’…

  102. Microsoft ha liberado el Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 (SP1) Beta, el cual incorpora los ‘fixes’…

  103. John says:

    Are you kidding???????????????? Microsoft! You’re getting me crazy! I’ll start to move to LAMP because you are doing very bad job!!!

    So we should move back to VB6 or what?

    You can’t mean this seriously! Stop kidding on DevDays and start working on development of products and listen to your clients!

    Or then die Microsoft and developers, developers, developers will move to LAMP!!!!!

  104. Amit Bahree says:

    Somasegar,

    I was wondering if you are going to respond to any of the questions / comments here? It would be nice to get Microsoft’s thoughts and issues.

    Given there are many people quite passionate about this?

    Anyone listening (from MS)????

  105. Nick says:

    Why do I have to install an ActiveX control just to download the freakin **release notes**.

    Jeepers get a grip guys!

    Let’s face it, the only reason this beta was released is so that MS could claim it met the "Q3 for VS2005 service pack" deadline.

    I hate being this cynical, but when I have to install yet another piece of activeX crap just to read a document I really do think someone at MS has lost the plot completely.

  106. Jonathan Schwarz thinks it will be sun (after being the dot in dot com, the java in the web designers…

  107. Somasegar says:

    I appreciate the amount of feedback on this topic and want to provide a little bit more background on why we made some of the decisions that we did.  

    Development tools as a whole have requirements that are not a part of normal applications.  Some of the things developer tools expect to do are also the types of things that malicious code tries to perform on a user machine.  As you all know, the Windows team has continued to make great progress w/Vista on the security front.  There are a number of new security related work and features that are a part of Windows Vista.  In the case of Visual Studio, things like debugging while attaching to a process requires reading and modifying that process’ memory, or registering a COM component directly conflict with the principles behind some of the new security features in Windows Vista.

    I’ve also clearly heard the concern around our decision not to support VS.NET 2003.  We know from talking to customers that some of them have been successful in using VS.NET 2003 and VS2005 on Windows Vista when running as an administrator on the machine.  However, there are some scenarios, like those I described above, that will not work. Going forward, we will provide more details on what these issues are and any known workarounds that you can use.  Also, when we have fixes to workaround some of these problems, we will make them available.  

    One other thing that I want to reiterate is that existing and future .NET Framework 1.1 and 2.0 applications will continue to work on Windows Vista.  

    You can check the Visual Studio on Windows Vista support page for more information and further announcements at http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/support/windowsvista/.

    Brian Harry of the Team Foundation Server team has a blog entry related to this – http://blogs.msdn.com/bharry.

    – somasegar  

  108. Somasegar says:

    Amit,

    I do want to provide a detail list of issues and any workarounds that we know of to customers.  We have a team working on this as we speak and we will be publish more specific information soon.

    – somasegar

  109. I just cannot stress how upset I am with the Visual Studio team. Since VS2005 was released, developers

  110. Andrew Young says:

    What about component developers who need to run Visual Studio 2002, 2003 and 2005 simultaneously?  Will we be expected to run multiple PCs or worse, resort to virtualization?

    This decision will also prevent our office from upgrading to Vista until all of our customers have completely upgraded to .NET 2.0.  Which is going to be a very long time.

  111. David Berg says:

    For those people with performance problems in VS 2005, we’d like to help.  If you can, please start by downloading SP1.  We’ve fixed a number of performance problems, and we’d like to know if we’ve fixed your problem.

    If you’re still having performance problems with VS 2005, please drop me a note at DevPerf@Microsoft.com.  Let me know about how big your solution is (# projects, # files, size of files), and what language and type of applications you’re developing.  Most importantly, if you can give me specific steps to reproduce the problem, and quantify how bad it is, that would be a great help.

    Thanks,

    Dave Berg

    Microsoft Developer Division, Performance Engineering Team

  112. Ok, so now we know that Windows Vista won’t support VisualStudio .NET 2003.  Its interesting that…

  113. Somebody can to do a good  alternative Operating System?

    No Vista ,"Blind", no .Net ,no .Java…….

  114. stefan wenig says:

    I understand that old development tools have troubles integration with the new security model of Vista, and I also understand that it would be a major effort to adapt and test the VS.NET 2003 code to support it.

    However, given the investments Microsoft partners have made into .NET 1.1, and given Microsofts commitment via its product life cycle, I really think MS should take the pain and provide a service pack of VS.NET 2003 at least that runs on Vista.

    A better alternative event would be to provide a VS 2005 service pack that can target .NET 1.1 too. The tight coupling of VS and .NET versions is a pain anyway, and it’s a problem that more componentized environments don’t have. I bet a lot of people would love that feature, and given the pressure that not supporting VS.NET 2003 creates, this might just be the time to justify this investment. After all, developers are probably the last people on earth MS would want to not migrate to Vista, right?

  115. Voordat je verder leest, lees eerst eens dit artikel van Somasegar. Ik wacht wel even…   Goed….

  116. Vista won’t support VS 2003 and availability of VS2005 SP1 beta

  117. Dan McKinley says:

    So now you’re claiming that the VB6 IDE works on Windows XP? (Sorry, that’s a cheapshot.)

    Frankly, I think this is obscene. I think I need to wait until I’ve calmed down considerably to comment on this in full.

  118. I was briefed earlier today on Visual Studio support on Windows Vista , and I wanted to clear the air…

  119. Is Backward Compatibility Holding Microsoft Back

  120. Hey Soma, where you say:

    >> Previously we announced our support for ensuring the Visual Basic 6.0 runtime and IDE on Windows Vista and we are on track for delivering that support. <<

    The link on the word "support" 404s!  What are you _really_ trying to say, there, hmmmm?  

  121. DotNetDev says:

    "Visual Studio 2005 SP1 will run on Vista but will likely have a few compatibility issues. We are working with the Vista team to understand those"

    1. So Vista’s been in development for over 5 years and a few weeks before RTM you’re working with the OS team to "understand" the compatability issues??  

    "Given the customer feedback that we’ve received since the launch of Visual Studio 2005 indicating the manageability of upgrading from Visual Studio .NET 2003 to Visual Studio 2005, we are focusing our efforts on ensuring VS 2005 is a great development platform for Vista."

    2. And didn’t anyone at MS notice that the lack of support for VS2003 may upset a significant number of your developer/customers?  Did you actually solicit any feedback from customers regarding this issue?  One has to always wonder where are you getting that "customer feedback" that you always claim to be driving your decisions.

  122. Rob Paulson says:

    Relax guys – the sky is ‘not’ falling…I haven’t read all of the comments, so I appologize if someone has explained this already – but…

    Vista has that niffty (or not so niffty) feature called UAC – User Access Control.  Remember, Windows is targeted at the masses; and UAC is going to help people like my Mom avoid ‘bad’ software/spyware/malware/whateverware.

    If you are the kind of person that knows what Visual Studio is, you are most likely not the kind of person who will benefit from UAC.  In fact, every developer I’ve talked to about Vista agrees that the first thing you should do after installing Vista is disable UAC.

    Would Tony Hawk keep the training wheels on his new bike?  Nope.

    If you disable UAC – Visual Studio 2003 works great.  Visual Studio 2005 works great.

    In the future, MS will release a patch for VS 2005 that will let it run on Vista *with* UAC on.  MS is not going to release a patch for VS 2003.  

    What that means to you, the developer is that, to use Visual Studio 2003 you can do any of the following…

    1.)  Disable UAC on Vista.

    2.)  Continue to run XP.

    3.)  Run Vista, but execute Visual Studio 2003 from a virtual machine running XP.

    I’d recommend #1.

  123. Vellore "Vetri" Vetrivelkumaran says:

    Here is another link to the support statement for VB6 IDE on Vista: http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/vbrun/ms788708.aspx

  124. The ServerSide.NET reports a worrying story that has started late last week, but caught my attention earlier this morning. The route of the article stems from this blog, as filed by a Microsoft VP annoucning that almost a year after…

  125. Martin says:

    Great that you have access to the Vista team, for the rest of us it is really a pain to make our software compatible to Vista. So thanks Microsoft for all the extra work!!

    "We are working with the Vista team to understand those, to provide workarounds where possible and also work on providing you with a set of fixes beyond SP1"

  126. stefan wenig says:

    Rob Paulson:

    somasegar’s post from friday 11:03 makes that all sound not quite as straightforward. VS 2003 and 2005 might have worked for _you_ with UAC disabled. but you might experience additional problems once you use certain features. if MS came out with a statement that says everything was tested and works fine with UAC disabled, i’d agree with you, but that hasn’t happened so far.

  127. The url for VS 2005 SP1 Beta Release Notes returns a page not found Error :

    http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/Downloads/DownloadDetails.aspx?DownloadID=3249

    Could you tell me where i can download the release notes ?

  128. Some VS2003 user says:

    Huh? What’s this? You’ll support VB 6.0 on Vista (even the IDE) and VS2005 but not VS2003? How does that happen? I thought .NET was exactly about shielding the developper away from the hassles of directly using Win32 by introducing a virtual machine? Doesn’t .NET 1.1 run un Visa or why won’t VS2003 work there? Or is it simply: It may work, but if it doesn’t don’t bother to contact our support, because we’d ignore these issues anyway?

  129. another user says:

    Some VS2003 user: VS is primarily unmanaged code, and a lot of that code is very low-level. others have explained this here, and somasegar himself has pointed out repeatedly that there are no problems with the .net runtime on vista in any version.

  130. Somasegar blogged last week about the availability of a beta release of SP1 for Visual Studio 2005 so

  131. MarkN says:

    Microsoft should at least officially support VS2003 on Vista with UAC disabled.

  132. chuck says:

    Still another 3-4 months for the release, this is lame.  Their are many show stopping bugs in 05, how is a developer suppose to do a release if 05 doesn’t get fixed until 07.

  133. Some VS2003 user says:

    Okay, VS may indeed be unmanaged code, but one thing is really better with the Borland brand of products: you can compily ANY code from previous versions with the latest without much hassle if you don’t use 3rd party addons or if you have the correct verisions of them.

    As it seems VS2005 can’t do .NET V1.1 applications anymore? Am I right? If yes, why? Why always forcing the developper to upgrade? It seems several billion dollars profit every year is not enough… (at least for some)

  134. Some VS2003 user says:

    Okay I stand a bit corrected: with a MS addon you can compile for NET1.1 with VS2005, but why not out of the box?

  135. Magnus says:

    I have tried to wait and calm down before writing a comment on this, but I have to realise I will not calm down on this issue. I must say that MS has made a very bad decision here. Vista is so late, several of the main features has been removed still there won’t be a .NET develoment environment that work without problems on it (as I understand not even 2005 with SP1 will work without problems). I don’t know which studio version that is most common today, but most of those I talk to still do most of the work with VS 2003. VS 2005 is only used if is really necesary to develop for .NET 2.0, otherwise many prefer 1.1 (or actually VS 2003).

    Somaseger says several times that .NET 1.1 applications will run on Vista. I assume that he never installed .NET 1.1 on Vista. Since it for some reason that I don’t understand the 1.1 framework is not included in Vista. When installing it you get a warning about compatibility issues. So from my point of view I can not say to my customers that my 1.1 applications work on Vista since I can not accept that my customers should see the installation warnings/errors that currently exist when installing .NET 1.1 framwork on Vista.

  136. A VS2003 + VS2005 user says:

    The real problem of the the lack of VS 2003 support i Vista, is that Visual Slow 2005 dosnt support dev of .NET 1.x apps out of the box, but have to tweaked.

    When VS2002 was released on of the hypes, was the seperation of IDE and language (VB), but it seams that. NET goes hand in hand with a specific version of VS, and that really sucks!

  137. As announced on Soma’s blog, Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 Beta is available today. You can sign

  138. geekSpeak says:

    Here are some great resources from our Debugging .NET geekSpeak with John Robbins. John’s blog http://www.wintellect.com/Weblogs/CategoryView,category,John%20Robbins.aspx

  139. The reason I wonder that is because our dev teams seem to be pumping stuff out the door so fast at the

  140. The Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 Beta has just been released. Here’s the official announcement .

  141. I like VS 2005 (even though it has some performance problems) and I love C++/CLI very much. All my new projects target this development platform.

    But on the other side, there is a past. I have to maintain even (machine control) applications that still run on DOS and Windows 3.1. Therefore I have a lot of different compilers installed (copied) on my primary development machine. The majority of code I have to support uses VS2002. But there is also a significant amount of code that requires Borland C++ V4.5 (more than 100 machines run software produced with this compiler). So far there was never a problem compiling under NT/Win2K/XP all this ancient software. I hope, that this will also be true for Vista (with UAC turned off and working as an administrator). Otherwise Vista is not an operating system for developers.

  142. Via Tim … Some important news came out recently regarding visual studio 2005 and visual studio version

  143. This one is a couple of weeks old, but Soma has indicated that VS2002 and VS2003 will not be supported

  144. Bob says:

    This seems to be the new rule for Microsoft and not the exception. When SQL 2005 and VS 2005 came out, Microsoft *refused* to support either with Commerce Server 2002, even though that was the latest RTM version of Commerce Server at the time. Now they are releasing a new Windows version and not supporting anything except a beta, hopefully be released, version of a SP for one of the latest development environments, and, if I noticed correctly, I get a warning about installing SQL 2005 on vista and it needing SP2 for SQL 2005…and I believe SP1 just recently came out.

    What happened to the old policy? Support policies were current version and 2 back. I understand they cant support everything, but it is a shame they are bowing to the mid 1990s stuck in time developers running Visual Studio 6, which is *clearly* out of the support cycle and are refusing to support VS 2003. What the hell is wrong with this place? Is this what we have expect going forward? With the new pricing structure of MSDN, it is a heck of a price to pay to get a VS IDE that is only supported for 2 years.

    Someone needs to bow their head in shame and get this fixed.

  145. Gary says:

    There is now one more reason why it will be a long time before we deploy Vista here. Oh well.

  146. Microsoft ha liberado el Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 (SP1) Beta, el cual incorpora los ‘fixes’…

  147. Oscar Calvo says:

    I am trying to access the site, it seems that its down.

  148. We are investing a lot of time in ensuring applications that work on Windows XP will work on Windows

  149. I installed Windows Vista RC2 a couple of weeks ago and started working on some of the remaining issues

  150. HL says:

    Nobody forces you to develop on Vista, like previously said you can still develop on XP and target a Vista machine.

    So, what you will need if you want to continue to develope using VS2003 is to run Vista on a separate machine or in a virtual machine on your dev machine for testing purposes.

    What are you all complaining about ? You still have all the options available to you and your apps will still work on Vista.

    Please learn to read, and learn how to understand what you read, some of you here seem to have real problems with that.

  151. kayle says:

    "Nobody forces you to develop on Vista, like previously said you can still develop on XP and target a Vista machine."

    So, what you will need if you want to continue to develope using VS2003 is to run Vista on a separate machine or in a virtual machine on your dev machine for testing purposes. (…)"

    I’m afraid this is not enough !

    We must be able to debug programs under vista since its API implementation is not perfectly backward compliant with XP, 2000, (what else…)

    It is impossible to discard VS2003 so simply…

  152. Service Pack 1 (SP1) for Visual Studio 2005 clients and Team Foundation Server is scheduled to release

  153. Service Pack 1 (SP1) for Visual Studio 2005 clients and Team Foundation Server is scheduled…

  154. A while ago Somasegar’s blog post about MS not supporting Visual Studio 2003 on Windows Vista caused

  155. S. Somasegar has a post on his blog about the delay in the release of VS 2005 SP1 (it was due in Q3 2006

  156. I’ve upgraded my home computer from Windows XP sp2 to Vista , which you must have heard that Microsoft

  157. Vista’s done! Finally 🙂 For those who have tried the beta or an Release Candidate, you’ll notice a few

  158. Today the Visual Studio 2005 team released Service Pack 1 Beta . Included in the beta is the new linker

  159. After backing up my files (and checking things twice), I decided to install Windows Vista Ultimate last

  160. Après Vista et les jeux , voici Vista et les développeurs: Tout d’abord, si vous développez sous VS 2002

  161. When my laptop died a horrible NTLDR-is-missing-death I decided it was time to get into the Temple of…

  162. Jeff Stong says:

    Yesterday, I installed Windows Vista as a fresh install (that is, I wasn’t upgrading another Windows…

  163. Before installing the release of Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 , you must uninstall the Service Pack

  164. Before installing the release of Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 , you must uninstall the Service Pack

  165. So we have a few service packs to talk about…. Firstly, Visual Studio 2005, SP1 is now in beta testing.

  166. If you are using Vista as your web development platform with Visual Studio 2005 then the following information

  167. A useful list post for web development over Windows Vista (pasted below)via Doug If you are using Vista…

  168. This is not what was stated by Somasager stated , here is what he said: However, we will not support

  169. I&#39;m not sure how this one got started. I&#39;ve even seen some document out there on a major site

  170. I have had about 5 people ask me about Visual Studio .NET 2003/2005 and Windows Vista, so I thought I

  171. OK, I Love VB6 still, so I did allow myself a little grin when I read this.

  172. We are pleased to announce the availability of the beta of Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1. You can

  173. Luna says:

    Somasegar posted some details on his blog concerning Vista support for different versions of the Visual

  174. Weddings says:

    Today, I’m pleased to announce the availability of the beta of Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1. Based on your feedback, Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 addresses issues that were found through a combination of customer reports, MSDN Product Feedbac

  175. fghjfgh says:

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