Long live C++


In an interview at the April 2005 ACCU Conference, Bjarne Stroustrup, the creator of C++ said that it is a misconception that C++ will be taken over by newer languages. I am sure the 3+ million C++ programmers around the world would concur with that.


 


I doubt you’ll find many people creating web apps in C++ but C++ will be around for a long time, especially in embedded systems and traditional application development.  C#, Visual Basic.Net, C++ and Java will each occupy a unique place in the programming languages world, with different languages more suited for different kinds of applications and scenarios.  It is absolutely our strong belief in a multi-language ecosystem that led us to provide the same, state of the art of tools for all languages in Visual Studio.


 


The Managed C++ extensions enable developers to leverage existing C++ classes in targeting the .NET framework, enabling you to write code that targets the CLR (Common Language Runtime).


 


Visual Studio 2005 takes C++ development to a new level. For example, developers will get the same drag-and-drop experience creation of user interface as other languages, the same automatic statement completion and the same intuitive graphical debugger. Visual C++ 2005 developers will be able to build high performance 32-bit native code applications, use web services to interact with popular sites such as Amazon.com and Ebay, add professional quality 3D/2D graphics, video and sound using the DirectX SDK, all while generating robust and extremely fast code using our world-class C/C++ compiler.


 


C++ is here to stay for a long time and we are committed to providing the best tools for C++ development.


 


Namaste!


Comments (6)

  1. Kris says:

    Good to see this. Just wondering how MS is using the new Managed C++ in their own products. Can you reveal some info just so people like me can be convinced that pursuing Managed C++ once again would be worthwhile. I remember that when VC++ initially started suporting Managed framework I see there was lot of focus on it, but this new release of C++ doesnt seem to have the same fan following inspite of the fact that it has a much cleaner syntax. Any thoughts?

  2. wOOdy says:

    I wonder, when (or if) we finally see a similar statement regarding Visual FoxPro from you… This development tool is the perfect fit for the Small and Midrange shops, for which DotNet is just an overkill and who are fading away to other OS platforms and development tools.

  3. Wil says:

    > It is absolutely our strong belief in a multi-language ecosystem that led us to provide the same, state of the art of tools for all languages in Visual Studio.

    Will Class Designer be available for VC++ in VS2005? If not, when?

    > I doubt you’ll find many people creating web apps in C++

    None will be, unless Web Forms allows them to do so. Will it?

    > C#, Visual Basic.Net, C++ and Java will each occupy a unique place in the programming languages world

    Indeed, VS Tools for Office will not support VC++, for that reason. However, that seems contrary to the whole CLI concept. You **ought** to be able to use MSIL without regard for which language’s compiler generated it, if the multi-lingual claims for .Net were to be really meaningful. IMHO…

  4. stevetei says:

    >>Just wondering how MS is using the new Managed C++ in their own products. Can you reveal some info just so people like me can be convinced that pursuing Managed C++ once again would be worthwhile.<<

    The new version of managed C++ is what we call C++/CLI, and the "worthwhileness" of the language will be pretty self evident when you give it a try. There simply is no better way to do interop between native C++ and managed code, and the language extensions are very elegant. On the VC++ team, we’re seeing just about every product group with a large C++ code base that they wish to leverage into .NET seriously considering managed C++ (in 2003) or C++/CLI (in 2005). A shipping product that I know of off the top of my head that uses managed C++ is DirectX, who built their .NET interface in managed C++, but there are several other products in development that use managed C++ or C++/CLI.

    >>I remember that when VC++ initially started suporting Managed framework I see there was lot of focus on it, but this new release of C++ doesnt seem to have the same fan following inspite of the fact that it has a much cleaner syntax. Any thoughts? <<

    Actually, we’re getting overwhelmingly positive feedback on C++/CLI from early adopters. Perhaps it’s not getting ink because the fact that VC++ can talk to .NET is not new, but the excitement level is definitely there among those that have tried it.

    >>Will Class Designer be available for VC++ in VS2005? If not, when? <<

    No, unfortunately this was a feature we were forced to (rather painfully) cut a couple of months ago when it became clear that we wouldn’t be able to pull it off in combination with the team’s other priorities. I can’t say for sure when it will be in, but we’ll certainly include it in the planning process for Orcas (the next version of VS after 2005).

    >>Indeed, VS Tools for Office will not support VC++, for that reason. However, that seems contrary to the whole CLI concept. You **ought** to be able to use MSIL without regard for which language’s compiler generated it, if the multi-lingual claims for .Net were to be really meaningful.<<

    The lack of C++ support for VSTO has little to do with the language-neutrality of the .NET platform itself. The issue is that there is language-specific GUI work involved, so the team targeted the C# and VB.NET language for this release because those languages are in higher demand among VSTO developers. We appreciate your feedback on this, as customer demand will dictate whether C++ support is included in a future release of VSTO.

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