Debugging Direct3D programs: a taxonomy of error conditions

Eric Lippert wrote a fantastic article that categorizes C# exceptions into four categories: Exogenous exceptions occur due to the messy nature of reality.  Filesystems can run out of space.  Network connections can drop.  These things are rare, but they do happen and robust code needs to be ready to deal with them. Boneheaded exceptions, as…

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Catalin Zima on converting textures to .dds

Catalin has a great article on how to convert textures to .dds format, which is the most efficient way to load images for use with Direct3D.  He describes how to integrate the texconv tool (from DirectXTex) into Visual Studio using MSBuild, so textures can be automatically converted every time you build your project. There’s lots…

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Beware of D3D feature level 11 in the Windows Phone emulator

Windows Phone 8 devices support Direct3D 11.1 feature level 9.3, but our emulator uses the WARP rasterizer, which can handle all the way up to feature level 11.  This means that, if you aren’t careful, it is possible to accidentally use more advanced D3D features while developing in the emulator, only to get an unpleasant…

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Speed: in which MSDOS meets Windows Phone 8

Inspired by long standing XNA team tradition, the Windows Phone graphics team recently spent some time using our product and trying to build some apps.  One of our goals in supporting native C++ was to make it easier to port existing software and frameworks to the platform, so I thought, what is the most legacy…

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