Building a better ASP.NET 2.0 user experience with Microsoft AJAX technologies


When

Oct. 5th  12:00P-1:30P EST (9:00A-10:30A PST)

Where

Register at this link:

http://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/WebCastEventDetails.aspx?EventID=1032311753&EventCategory=2&culture=en-US&CountryCode=US

Note: Audio will be via the Internet, so your machine will need a speaker.

Abstract

The ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX Extensions is a new development technology that integrates the cross platform Microsoft AJAX Library with the ASP.NET 2.0 server-based development framework. The Microsoft AJAX Library offers you the same type of development platform for client-based web pages that ASP.NET offers for server-based pages. Both the ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX Extensions and the Microsoft AJAX Library integrate with existing ASP.NET 2.0 server-based services like Membership, Personalization, and ASMX (as well as WCF) Web Services . The ASP.NET AJAX Control Toolkit is a thin enabling layer, leveraging both the Microsoft AJAX Library and the ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX Extensions, which allows you to build your own AJAX enable ASP.NET server controls. The toolkit comes with 20+ (and growing with each release) sample controls ready to use in your applications. In this session, you will learn how easy it is to AJAX enable an ASP.NET 2.0 application with Microsoft AJAX technologies.

Who Should Attend

Architects and Developers who would like to get an insight on how to build a better web user experience using ASP.NET AJAX.

 

-Marc

Comments (5)

  1. Morris Valentine says:

    A disappointment.  Most of the world doesn’t use ASP.Net for server-side development, but that’s all what was discussed in relation to Ajax during this webinar.  Yes, the title was "Build a Better ASP.Net 2.0 User Experience", but the run-up to the webinar also touted using Ajax for client-centric web programming.  For those of us who have been interested in using Ajax just for this purpose, the webinar was a complete waste of time.

  2. FederalDev says:

    Morris,

    I am sorry you felt you wasted your time.  The abstract states the webcast covers the following:

    -ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX Extensions – First part

    -ASP.NET AJAX Control Toolkit – Second part

    Both of these technologies require ASP.NET.

    The third part of the webcast covered:

    -Microsoft AJAX Library

    This is the piece that works without ASP.NET.  I showed demos using the Microsoft AJAX Library in conjuction with ASP.NET Web Services.  Granted, I also showed ASP.NET server pieces that make the client side stuff easier.  I also included a link to a recorded client-centric programming webcast the dives deeper into the Microsoft AJAX Library.  You might check out that webcast:

    http://www.microsoft.com/events/EventDetails.aspx?CMTYSvcSource=MSCOMMedia&Params=%7eCMTYDataSvcParams%5e%7earg+Name%3d%22ID%22+Value%3d%221032302261%22%2f%5e%7earg+Name%3d%22ProviderID%22+Value%3d%22A6B43178-497C-4225-BA42-DF595171F04C%22%2f%5e%7earg+Name

    The focus of the webcast was not HOW you can use the Microsoft AJAX Library on other platforms.  That’s not my expertise.  I did share that it’s possible.  If you would like to look at examples of HOW, then have a look at the following links:

    PHP:

    http://www.shankun.com/AtlasPhp.aspx

    http://www.shankun.com/Atlas_Php_2.aspx

    Cold Fusion:

    http://blogs.msdn.com/brada/archive/2006/06/29/649944.aspx

    I hope this is helpful.

    -Marc

  3. FederalDev says:

    BTW, I am renaming the title to something more clear:

    "Introduction to ASP.NET AJAX"

    -Marc

  4. Jon Hilton says:

    In response to the statement that "most of the world doesn’t use asp.net"

    I would point out that whilst stats are hard to come by in this area, a recent survey of Fortune 1000 Companies found that 48.4% of them used asp.net for their Application Servers with "Java Platforms" coming a distant 2nd with 12.7%.

    The point is that (as far as I can tell) this was primarily aimed at ASP.NET developers with a bit in there for non asp.net developers, and I would have thought most who attended would have felt it was relevant