Alas, Microsoft Building 109 Conference Room A is no more


Some time ago, I noted that "Building 109 Conference Room A" was a code word for the bar at the Azteca restaurant next to building 109. Alas, that code word is no more, because the Azteca restaurant has been demolished to make way for an apartment complex.

But when a door closes, a new door opens. I've learned that the Chipotle's next to Amazon's new downtown Bellevue office "Everest" has been nicknamed Everest Conference Room C.

Comments (8)
  1. Brian_EE says:

    Across the street from our building is a bar named “The Dr.’s Inn”. We call it “going to the doctor’s office”.

  2. John says:

    There’s a bar located roughly a five minute walk from my old apartment that I nicknamed The Home Office because whenever I received a page at night I’d walk over, order a drink, and log in to figure out what was going on. The bartenders didn’t mind because I helped them with their IT stuff.

  3. MartinJ says:

    I imagine that there are quite a few instances like that. I know that we have a bar named “The Library” here. In another city that I used to live in, there was a bar named “The Bank,” named because it used to be one a long time ago (and still had the vault to prove it).

  4. Heh. :) One might feel you guys are from the prohibition era.

  5. George says:

    A few weeks ago, I received a Google calendar invitation to a meeting in the [xyz] Room. I was interested to see that the name of the room was a hyperlink, and clicked on it to see whether our Facilities staff had done something slick, perhaps providing photographs or a floor plan. They had not. Google had noticed that there is a bar called The [xyz] Room in a midwestern city, and had provided this link.

    1. ErikF says:

      That room is where all the variable names go after they’re finished being used. It also contains the bit buckets for all your computers, but make sure that qualified maintenance personnel empty those periodically.

      1. Tanveer Badar says:

        Incorrect, that’s where all regex hang out.

  6. Antonio Rodríguez says:

    In Spain, several years ago there was a television series called “Los ladrones van a La Oficina” (“Thiefs Go to The Office”). Note the capitalization: “La Oficina” (“The Office”) was the name of a café where, among the regular crowd, there was a group of pickpockets and con artists. The pun was that, in Spanish, “ir a la oficina” (“to go to the office”) means to go to work, specially at a white-collar position – quite the opposite to what pickpockets do.

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