The description of my 2008 PDC talk is wrong


The title is mostly okay, but the description is wrong. Thanks to the power of web scripting, I can’t actually link to my talk; I can just link to the main session page, and then you’ll have to go searching for it. (Maybe there’s a direct link but I can’t find it.)

The title Windows 7: Deep Dive – What’s New with Win32’s user32 and comctl32 is mostly okay. Except that it’s not Windows 7, because I don’t talk about the future; I talk about the past. So it’s really Windows Vista: Deep Dive – What Was New with Win32’s user32 and comctl32.

The description needs work, though. I submitted an updated version just last night, but who knows if they’ll approve it. The description I had in mind goes more like this:

This talk focuses on the lowest level user interface components (user32, comctl32) that appear in almost every Windows application. You’ll learn about “recent” changes and enhancements in these subsystems, plus be subjected to some philosophical musings on how foreground activation is like love. (No really, it will actually help you write better software.)

Comments (28)
  1. Whatever says:

    That (microsoftpdc.com) has to one of the worst sites in terms of usability I have ever seen. I know, I know, there’s nothing you can do about it, Raymond, I’m just venting, and warning anyone else who uses it (maybe it is better with a browser other than FF).

  2. steven says:

    Seems like your updated description is already there. Now I’m wondering what the old one was.

  3. Adrian says:

    After three years here at Microsoft, there’s still one thing I haven’t gotten used to:  everyone referring to the Windows API as Win32.  I worked at many ISVs before coming to MSFT.  At all of those places, we said "WinAPI" (rhymes with "sappy").  Win32 (or Win16, Win32s, etc.) was reserved for those times where you had to make a distinction between the different flavors of the Windows API.  Now that 64-bit computing is becoming mainstream in the PC world, I’m continually surprised how entrenched the Win32 moniker has become.  Where’s Win64?

  4. Karellen says:

    Someone mod "Whatever" up! :) Bleargh!

    Particularly annoying is that your browser’s "find in page" can’t scroll to the bit that says "chen" when you search for it, due to the completely non-standard (and ugly) panel/scrollbar thing. You actually have to do manually scroll and search by eye to find the talk you’re looking for.

    (For those still looking, it’s about 2/3 of the way down)

  5. zz says:

    The closest thing to a direct link is this Channel 9 page:

    http://channel9.msdn.com/pdc2008/PC43/

    I got it from clicking on "View Session Details"  via https://sessions.microsoftpdc.com/public/sessions.aspx# . (Though, it doesn’t offer many details)

  6. The sessions page is completely unusable if JavaScript isn’t enabled. I think those responsible need to learn something about progressive enhancement – or, at the very least, graceful degradation.

  7. Neil (SM) says:

    Sometimes I think the only reason some people have Javascript disabled is so they can complain about all the sites that don’t work with Javascript disabled.

  8. Frank Schwab says:

    Sometimes I think the only reason some people have <x> disabled is so they can complain about all the sites that don’t work with <x> disabled.

    Replace <x> with:

    Cookies

    Javascript

    Pop-ups

    Flash

    Silverlight

    Java

    ActiveX

    Can you honestly say you have them all enabled on your web browser?  If so, you are a braver man than I.

  9. John says:

    I think web browsing (and hopefully computing in general) will really start to slide in the direction of end-user interests rather than corporate interests.  The only sane way to browse the web today is Firefox + Adblock Plus + NoScript.

  10. Gabe says:

    It’s really telling when you I have to View Source to easily find Raymond’s session and read the description.

  11. Brian says:

    Does anyone know if there’s going to be a DVD available of this talk?  I won’t be able to go to the PDC, but I’d like to see it.

  12. Mark says:

    Nothing like a good bit of foreground activation to get me in the mood… :P

  13. parobu says:

    WPF is the way of the future, and since it doesn’t use Windows controls at all, who cares about changes to comctl32.

  14. Mike Dunn says:

    Brian> After the last PDC, MS hosted videos of all the talks for a few months. They might do the same this year.  

  15. Cheong says:

    The description is corrected, but the title and tags are still "Windows 7"… :O

  16. Dean Harding says:

    "WPF is the way of the future"

    Look at the title of this blog. In fact, look at Raymond’s actual words: "I don’t talk about the future; I talk about the past"

  17. Merus says:

    Isn’t JavaScript the ‘J’ in Ajax, though? The usability improvements from Ajax transformed the Web. AdBlock Plus, definitely, but I can’t imagine seriously browsing without JavaScript these days.

  18. Worf says:

    The main problem with javascript these days is that there are a bunch of malicious scripts out there. There is one running around that uses SQL injection to embed itself into a website, which then causes the user visiting that site to get a bunch of stuff installed on their PC. What’s worse is a bunch of legit sites are infected as well. A lot of security issues are resolved by having javascript off by default (including XSS ones).

    And extensions like NoScript make the web faster by not having the browser stall if you accidentally click on a link that forces a plugin to load. Plus all those annoying "rich media ads" go away too.

  19. GRiNSER says:

    I don’t know who made this PDC site but why can’t they use overflow: auto instead of this freakin idiotic javascript scrollbar. Besides they could make direct linking happen with the wonderful url #anchor stuff that can be read out by javascript which could then scroll the overflow: auto (!!!) list and select the correct item…

  20. Whatever says:

    I think web browsing (and hopefully computing in general) will really start to slide in the direction of end-user interests rather than corporate interests.

    You’re more of an optimist than I am, then.

  21. Simon Buchan says:

    FYI: Find seems to work fine in IE8, except it breaks the scroll.

  22. Neil says:

    GRiNSER, at least in Firefox 3, named anchors scroll overflowed areas automatically.

  23. Tihiy says:

    Oh, Raymond, can you push ILC_COLOR32 to be the default for imagelist flags? I’ve seen too many icons broken because of programmers uncaring about it (in Windows too), and this is certainly not the big compatibility issue (much more things were broken on Classic->XP->Vista comctl32 path).

  24. SuperKoko says:

    From Frank Schwad:

    "Can you honestly say you have them all enabled on your web browser?"

    How can I enable ActiveX in GNU/Linux?

    The Web is so "open" that you need a Windows+IE PC to use it!

    From Merus:

    "The usability improvements from Ajax transformed the Web."

    Making pretty any site unusable. Making direct linking, bookmarking, multi-windows browsing, printing almost impossible, and making the browser unresponsive with 512K ADSL connections (I don’t even know what it is with a 56K).

  25. Luo says:

    Hello Raymond!! you are my hero, are you working on Windows 7?

Comments are closed.