Is this the normal way of comparing toilets?


My colleague Erin Dallin remarked, “I just installed a new toilet as part of my bathroom remodel. I was told that it is capable of flushing 20 golf balls using only 1.6 gallons of water. I’d love to know how this standard was developed.”

Visit the product Web site and click on Flushing system in action to watch the video. Or read Wired‘s coverage of flush technology.

“I also suspect that someday I’ll finally break down and verify just how many golf balls I can flush.”

Comments (21)
  1. John says:

    Flushing golf balls is not a particularly uselful metric.  Not only are they not the same shape as your typical turd, but they also have different densities and consistencies.  On the other hand, no two turds are alike so I guess you have to use some kind of universal standard.

  2. Duncan says:

    Peeled bananas is the usual standard :-)

  3. Reginald A. Simon III says:

    I don’t think I’ve ever clogged a toilet just from a massive poop, but I have clogged one with toilet paper.  Therefore they should use toilet paper as the universal standard.

    (The flushing video does show them flushing 41′ of toilet paper, but I don’t like how they cut it up into itty bitty pieces — I prefer to wad, thank you very much)

  4. Lascaille says:

    The weirdest thing about this, to me, is the ‘flush and run’ logo… As someone who spent a few years in America coming from the UK, I never understood how a first-world industrialised nation could seemingly accept a standardised toilet that would routinely clog and then overflow.

    Plungers are for sinks!

  5. John says:

    Duncan: I like!

    Reginald A. Simon III: There are many different kinds of toilet paper (ply, thickness, softness, durability, etc).

  6. Dale says:

    There is a toilet on sale in England I believe that has a 3" drain hole that you can flush 3 medium sized potatoes at the same time. With very little water I might add.

  7. Lauren Smith says:

    Call me when they’ve got it flushing 20 tennis balls.

  8. matthew says:

    Why is your colleague buying his toilet in Indonesia?

  9. DavidR says:

    Actually, the "normal" way is to use 50 (+/- 4) grams of soybean paste in a condom.

    The Canadian Water and Wastewater Association and the California Urban Water Conservation Council fund a study that rates various toilet models for their maximum performance.  New results are released every 6 months.

    Here is a copy:

    http://www.cwwa.ca/pdf_files/MAP%2010th%20Edition%20August%202007.pdf

  10. Sohail says:

    Hmm. Apparently its not safe to eat lunch while reading Raymond’s blog anymore.

    IMAGE GET OUT OF MY HEAD.

  11. ::Wendy:: says:

    Maybe the people they sell toilets to are extremely constipated.

    I wonder whther they test safety for goldfish by testing if they survive the flush?

  12. Cody says:

    "I wonder whther they test safety for goldfish by testing if they survive the flush?"

    I think you’re only supposed to flush the dead ones.  Flushing live ones would be cruel, considering the amount of waste product they’d end up in.

  13. Wang-Lo says:

    I am surprised that GE is still using the golf ball standard, as I heard that Dr. Kulkarni has refused to swallow any more of them.

    -Wang-Lo.

  14. Igor says:

    In Soviet Union we test our toilets by flushing 400 watermelons without water!

  15. James Schend says:

    The weirdest thing about this, to me, is the

    ‘flush and run’ logo… As someone who spent a

    few years in America coming from the UK, I

    never understood how a first-world

    industrialised nation could seemingly accept a

    standardised toilet that would routinely clog

    and then overflow.

    Are you referring to UK toilets or US ones? US toilets are either so powerful that they’ll simply suck everything down with a few flushes (like the ones found in office buildings and usually in restaurants), or have a safety to prevent them from overflowing (the ones in homes.) If your toilet is overflowing, you either kept flushing over and over again after it was obvious it was clogged, or it’s broken. My parents have an antique 1915 toilet, and even it doesn’t overflow unless it’s abused.

  16. Dean Harding says:

    Lascaille: You know, I live in Australia and I’ve never even OWNED a plunger my whole life…

  17. Jivlain says:

    Personally, I frequently need to use my vacuum cleaner to pick up bowling balls, so it’s a good thing that the ads for vacuum cleaners use that metric.

  18. Puckdropper says:

    I think the golf balls aren’t there as a scientific measure, but as a visual aid.  They’re there to sell the toilet, not perform scientific tests.

  19. Jim says:

    In Soviet Russia, the toilet flushes you!

  20. JBL says:

    Never mind goldfish, I thought the requirement was expressed in baby alligators!

  21. Darrell says:

    I find it weird that the advert would talk about antibacterial protection.  People, should really stop worrying about other peoples s**t. :)

Comments are closed.