Announcing the OData SDK


Last November at PDC 09 we announced the Open Data Protocol (OData), providing a way to unlock your data and free it from silos that exist in applications today. OData makes it easy for data to be shared in a manner that follows the philosophy of Open Data and enables the creation of REST-based data services. These services allow resources identified using Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs) and defined in an abstract data model, to be published and edited by Web clients using simple HTTP messages. OData enables a new level of data integration across a broad range of clients, servers, services, and tools.


This morning during the Keynote at Mix 2010, Doug Purdy announced the re-launch of OData.org and the release of the OData SDK.


The OData SDK brings together a wealth of resources to help developers participate in the OData Eco-system including:



  • Sample OData online services (northwind, etc) – open a browser and test out an OData Service.

  • OData client libraries


    • Windows Phone 7 series

    • iPhone

    • AJAX\Javascript

    • PHP

    • Java

    • .NET

    • Silverlight

  • Online OData explorer (Source code also available for download from odata.org)

  • Data Service Provider toolkit: Whitepaper and sample WCF Data Services provider implementation to demonstrate how to create a data service over *any* data source

  • OData validation tool: A test harness and a few sample validation tests to make it easy to validate your OData endpoint.  The harness is designed to be easily extended allowing anyone to easily add new tests.

Also announced today at Mix, there are some new OData services available publicly:



  • Netflix has exposed their catalog of movies via OData at http://odata.netflix.com

  • Microsoft codename ‘Dallas’ exposes datasets in the cloud and allows developers to access and monetize them using OData

  • SQL Azure now features an “OData easy button” – a one click experience to get your SQLAzure database exposed as an OData feed

How can you get involved in the OData ecosystem? Check out OData.org – Expose OData – and the next time you’re developing an app ask yourself, is there a feed for that? 


– The OData Team

Comments (37)

  1. Ted Neward says:

    How about a single PDF printable version of all the OData specs? Or at least the individual specs as PDF files? (Some of us prefer dead trees. 🙂 )

  2. zihotki says:

    +1 to pdf version of the specs.

  3. Bob says:

    Hard to take this too seriously.  Where is the VB6/VBA client library?  What about service libraries?

  4. Joshua says:

    VB6 is probably unsupported, so they probably won’t release a library themselves. But I think one could be made from the specs or other libraries.

  5. Michael A Griffey says:

    Seriously, VB6/VBA? Why not go all the way back to Basic? I think it may be time to migrate that code to .NET. VB6 is a dead language and has since been 4 times surpassed. Asking people to waste their valuable time on supporting VB6 is like asking web designers to make their site compatible with Internet Explorer 4. I for one am sick of all the VB6 compatibility crap. Why is Microsoft so bloated now? Oh yea, they have to support Stone Age programmers and a dead language that people can’t just let go. VB 1-6 have been retired and Windows 7 will be the last OS to even include the VB6 core runtime environment. Thankfully, most of the components (everything except for core) are already not installed on or supported by Windows Vista and Windows 7. Finally, after 10 years of dragging a corps behind them, Windows 8 will not support ANY functionality of VB6. Migrate or be replaced.

  6. Wes Williamson says:

    I see both sides of the VB6 compatibility issue. The problem boils down to thousands of small businessmen who bought or commissioned software years ago that works just fine running on old hardware. Those guys are the least able to financially support our audacious technology advances. They don’t see or understand the advantage to buying hardware and software that’s obviously several orders of magnitude beyond what they really need to do their business. They see it as technological blackmail, and frankly, I feel bad for them. Sorry to participate in the hijacking of this discussion. I just couldn’t resist.

  7. Antonio says:

    Thats the kind of people that should consider moving to Azure or a similar cloud offer. They don’t need to buy new hardware and what not and would pay only for what they actually use.

  8. Francesco says:

    What about the Compact Framework? Is it planned any support?

    Thank you

    Francesco

  9. smhasan18@hotmail.com says:

    oh nice .. 🙂 all i understand that we will be able to select, add, delete and update data with a simple HTTP Request. .. i hope microsoft will not be disabling the previous tools…

  10. laylac says:

    hope this will help my library 2 work…..

  11. Maximus says:

    "I see both sides of the VB6 compatibility issue. The problem boils down to thousands of small businessmen who bought or commissioned software years ago that works just fine running on old hardware. Those guys are the least able to financially support our audacious technology advances. They don’t see or understand the advantage to buying hardware and software that’s obviously several orders of magnitude beyond what they really need to do their business. They see it as technological blackmail, and frankly, I feel bad for them. Sorry to participate in the hijacking of this discussion. I just couldn’t resist." -if those people can’t afford to upgrade, their businesses suck and they should go out of business

  12. wgraham says:

    # Maximus said on March 24, 2010 4:20 AM:

    "if those people can’t afford to upgrade, their businesses suck and they should go out of business"

    Wow.

  13. ironside says:

    "if those people can’t afford to upgrade, their businesses suck and they should go out of business"

    hmm, modern consumerism, it ain’t broke but I’ll fix it anyway. VB6 is old and is supposed to be dying but why would you replace a core business product that does what you need and is proven through time served? That said while the hardware keeps going and the OS is alive it’s not a worry.

  14. Chris Venables says:

    The dilemma of wether to continue VB6 support is a difficult one for both sides. A company who has legacy VB6 applications shouldn’t be forced to replace them just because they are old, if they do the job they were intended for and do it well then there is unlikely to be a business case for upgrading.

    (and to say "if those people can’t afford to upgrade, their businesses suck and they should go out of business" is a rediculous statement – you are obviously not business minded Maximus and should stick to the coding 😉 )

    On the other side it doesn’t make good business sense for Microsoft to continue support for VB6, resources would be much better spent furthering more modern languages and developments.

    I think the key is a comprmise between Microsoft and the consumer, the fact that Microsoft have supported VB6 for such a long time, in my opinion, is enough of a comprimise from Microsofts side.

    I suppose some comfort can be taken in the fact that any companies which still have core systems written in VB6 probably have had them for quiet some time and need little support any more.

  15. Bill says:

    There is nothing stopping the business owners from using the VB6 apps.  However, the decision to use the VB6 apps (and not be forced to upgrade the code) comes with the limitation that they use it under an older OS.  So if they want to stick with their VB6 apps, then they are also stuck with NT4 and Win98.    

  16. RabidDog says:

    Interesting how a post about OData gets turned into a discussion about the viability of keeping VB6 around.

    No wonder meetings waste so much time.

    To the poster, thanks for the info, look forward to setting up a playground

  17. xern says:

    Never seen such  preparation needed to do a relatively simple procedure.

  18. xern says:

    Never seen such  preparation needed to do a relatively simple procedure.

  19. xern says:

    more of the same aand I do mean more.

  20. Ron Laughton says:

    My site has interesting data to share (online TV shows guide), currently via WCF. May I work with one of your experts to add OData?

    Kind regards,

    Ron

    Spreety[at]Spreety.com

  21. Mike Flasko says:

    Hi Ron,

    send me an email (mike.flasko at microsoft.com) and I’ll help you out.

    -Mike Flasko

  22. Matthew Jackson says:

    I was able to locate the DSPToolkit, but I cannot find the whitepaper…Any ideas where I can get my hands on this?

  23. Matthew Jackson says:

    Oops nevermind…I see it is in the Custom Data Service Providers.html…I was trying to find a .doc or something.

    Thanks a bunch to the whole OData team.

  24. Matthew Jackson says:

    Oops nevermind…I see it is in the Custom Data Service Providers.html…I was trying to find a .doc or something.

    Thanks a bunch to the whole OData team.

  25. I can quite happily call Http endpoints from VB6.  There is nothing that OData exposes that is not accessible via VB6 or VBA.

  26. @Bill VB6 apps can still run quite fine under Windows 7 64bit.  I’m not sure why you would think otherwise.

  27. Jim says:

    "The dilemma of wether to continue VB6 support is a difficult one for both sides. A company who has legacy VB6 applications shouldn’t be forced to replace them just because they are old, if they do the job they were intended for and do it well then there is unlikely to be a business case for upgrading."

    This is a great comment, but it’s proof that nobody on a forum ever actually reads the comments properly. Nobody said anything about upgrading a particular application or collection of code. This whole conversation started by someone asking about VB6 libraries being developed to work with this technology. The assumption is that these libraries would be used to create NEW VB6 code. (an oxymoron, I know).

    Asking whether or not MS should continue to support VB6’s development (i.e. publishing VB6 libraries for newer technologies) – I say absolutely not. Those of you who have called it a dead language are right. It is a corpse. But should MS allow companies to continue to use existing VB 1-6 applications/runtimes? Absolutely. It’s like a contractor coming to your house to redo  your driveway. He says he can do the job, but the new surface won’t allow you to park your older car on it… only new cars. That’s sorta crap, no?

  28. Steve says:

    re: VB6 – has anyone here ever heard of COBOL?  and thats not meant in a derogatory sense – just a parallel.

    Software development is about Pragmatism not Idealism.

    Anyway – does anyone idea what kind of overhead using OData will create? – especially on WCF apps that don’t necessarily need an abstract DAL?

  29. Tom B says:

    Link to the pdf doc.

    http://bit.ly/dmQkUC

    captcha = 144.  gross!

  30. Larry says:

    Heard of COBOL? LOL Not for a while.

    COmon Business Oriented Language.

    I programmed in COBOL years ago 🙂

  31. Neil says:

    Well and truly hijacked, could we have some more useful comments about the actual post please.

  32. Neil said says:

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  33. JM says:

    Why holding out your hand and waiting for someone to deliver to you. Rollup your sleeve and build it on your own. This thread seems like bunch of panhandlers begging for a few lines of code.

  34. grahamsw says:

    What about RDF? It’s a W3C standard, it’s had a ton of work done on it, and it’s provably complete, as in it’s sufficient to describe the schema and contents of any data.

    Why another standard? RDF has had nothing like the impact that it should have, yet, though there are some areas where it’s been widely adopted. This seems like an area where MS could really get a serious competative advantage, while playing nice with open standards. (as the did when they made it so easy to write web services in .NET – have you ever seen what you have to do to write them in java?).

    Almost all the development in RDF/Semantic web is in java. If you’d made it easy to develop semantic web applications in .NET and you would have had a big win, and taken away a really good reason to abandon .NET

    Everybody loves standards, that’s why there are so many of them.

  35. Calm down all you legacy supporters out there…

    It's a TRIVIAL task to take the .NET libraries and expose as a simplified COM interface.

    Most legacy languages can easily implement COM interfaces.

    We specialize in producing many simple COM wrappers to keep old apps alive, people can come to me, but you could easily do it yourself. The 'oldest' app that I have supported in this way recently was a COBAL app.

    I haven't looked yet, what if the .NET libraries are already support COM?

    C'mon we're developers.

    "Don't ask someone else to do something that I can easily do myself, only I can customize it to suit my specific domain requirements."

  36. MitchB says:

    @Grahamsw – Well shot.

    RDF is a fascinating standard. I was led to it while working with the RDF files that delineate the Project Gutenberg library. Wrote a parsing engine for same and made it part of a larger software project (follow the link). Hence my interest in this forum.

    As to the VB6 and COBOL threads… yeah, dead languages with millions and millions of lines of productive, mature, completely sufficient code churning away perfectly… keeping the businesses of America running smoothly … right this second. Making an argument for forcing people to upgrade is very similar to the argument that moving manufacturing jobs out of the country will be good for the economy … and we all know what happened then. 🙂