When does EA start to care about sociocultural influences?

Organizations do not work, in real life, like they work on paper.  On paper, there are departments (all shaped like a neat rectangle) and business processes with neat inflows and outflows of responsibility and information.  On paper, you improve things by modeling things on paper, and then moving things around, on paper, then teaching people…

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Should Business Architects use the Business Model Canvas at the Program level?

In the Open Group conference at Newport Beach, I listened to a series of presentations on business architecture.  In one of them, the presenter described his practice of using Osterwalder’s Business Model Canvas to create a model of his program’s environment after a business program (aka business initiative) is started.  He felt that the canvas…

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Analysis, Synthesis, and Scope: Business Architecture vs. Business Analysis, part two

A few days ago, I quickly dashed off a post on the difference between a business architect and a business analyst.  The reaction was immediate and rather vociferous.  The IIBA took me to task for saying that a business architect is NOT a business analyst.  In addition, Tom Graves (Enterprise Architect) asked me to consider…

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The difference between business architect and business analyst

[Author’s note: within an hour of posting the following article, Kevin Brennen of the IIBA dry-roasted the post on his own blog.  You can find a link to his entry here: Business Architecture is Business Analysis.  I have made an attempt to fix a few of the most egregious errors in the post, and to…

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Time-to-Release – the missing System Quality Attribute

I’ve been looking at different ways to implement the ATAM method these past few weeks.  Why?  Because I’m looking at different ways to evaluate software architecture and I’m a fan of the ATAM method pioneered at the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University.  Along the way, I’ve realized that there is a flaw that…

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On the Hunt for the One-Page View of an Enterprise

I am currently noodling the idea of a one-page view of my employer (Microsoft) for the purpose of rationalizing the sharing of services across business units and business models.  (If you understood the previous sentence, you are probably an enterprise architect, even if that is Not your title). As a result, I’m on a hunt…

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Perhaps the most valuable conversation you can have… starts with a question

A co-worker and I spent an hour doing something innovative… and no, it was not part of a “Google 20% strategy.”  We spent an hour discussing PKI, personal identity, and trust of both “passive content” (like documents) and “active content” (like applications) as that content originates from one actor, passes through another actor, and finds…

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When demand management is confused with alignment…

One of the most common, and reasonable, mechanisms for achieving clarity on the roadmap for a single platform is “demand management.”  It is also one of the areas of IT that is both rapidly evolving and poorly defined.  I’d like to offer an opinion about what demand management is, and is not, and how it…

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Building less than you know you’ll need

In the past, I’ve been guilty of this sin: gold-plating.  Back when I was a solution architect, I would (often) think about the things that the business is going to need, but never asked for.  I would occasionally include elements in the design to support those needs, even though the business didn’t ask for them. …

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How the Program Management Office Views Enterprise Architecture…

There’s an interesting analysis available through the PMO Executive Board on “Project Interdependencies.”  In the problem statement, the author correctly observes: As the volume and size of projects grow, the old problem of managing project and program interdependencies is becoming more acute: three quarters of PMOs consider “managing interdependencies” to be one of their most…

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