When does EA start to care about sociocultural influences?

Organizations do not work, in real life, like they work on paper.  On paper, there are departments (all shaped like a neat rectangle) and business processes with neat inflows and outflows of responsibility and information.  On paper, you improve things by modeling things on paper, and then moving things around, on paper, then teaching people…

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Placing Architecture Properly into Scrum Processes

As I’m about to complete my share of a longer engagement on using Lean principles to improve the processes at an online services firm, it occurred to me that the efforts we undertook to properly embed Architecture practices into their Scrum process were novel.  I haven’t seen much written about how to do this in…

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Everything you’ve read about IT Project Failure is wrong

I did a scan around the web to figure out what many of the leading thinkers were saying about IT project failure and the root causes.  Numbers varied between 20% and 80% of projects failing to deliver on their business case.  The root cause analysis that follows from these failure numbers spends a lot of…

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Service Oriented Architecture Conceptual Model

Almost two years ago, I described some of the key concepts of service oriented architecture, including the distinction between a canonical model and a canonical message schema.  Since that time, I worked on a wide array of models, including Microsoft IT’s Common Conceptual Model.  That model (CCM for short) is the metamodel for IT concepts…

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How the Program Management Office Views Enterprise Architecture…

There’s an interesting analysis available through the PMO Executive Board on “Project Interdependencies.”  In the problem statement, the author correctly observes: As the volume and size of projects grow, the old problem of managing project and program interdependencies is becoming more acute: three quarters of PMOs consider “managing interdependencies” to be one of their most…

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SOA Optimistic Data Synchronization considered harmful

Let’s say that you have two systems: Adipose and BellyFat.  They both need the same information.  Adipose handles customer transactions, so it needs information about customers.  BellyFat handles the long-term management of customer information, like what products they have purchased and what rights they own.  It also needs information about customers. How do we keep…

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Civil Engineering Analogy to Enterprise Architecture: Flawed

It is typical to see comparisons of Civil Engineering to Enterprise Architecture.  A number of papers from Gartner have made the comparison, as have many articles and conference discussions.  I have made the comparison myself. It is a somewhat apt analogy.  After all, both EA and Civil Engineering are responsible for setting standards (codes) that…

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Put perspective on both short and long term problems

I’m always a bit worried when someone has “the answer.”  Lot’s of red flags go up when someone tells me: this is the problem and this is how you solve it.  Perhaps I’m just that kind of person. I had a recent exchange with Alex Maclinovsky over at Sun.  Very practical guy.  Love his stuff. …

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Standardization works with a limited, and rational, scope

I’ve been on a roll lately, calling for the creating of a standardized approach to the partitioning of Line-of-Business apps.  One reader commented that we are a long way from “plug and play” integration. The real answer is more subtle than that.  Not all business are alike.  Therefore, one standard for all software doesn’t make…

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Standards and Innovation

When I opened my call for a Shared Global Integration Model, I expected some folks to say “we don’t need that.”  What I didn’t expect was the argument that standards are somehow a bad idea. It’s hard to consider an argument against standards with a straight face.  A basic tenet of the modern age has…

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