Should Enterprise Architecture rock your world?

In many organizations, EA is a sidelined process or a last thought.  It is hard to be effective in that case.  In other organizations, EA is a core part of IT planning and delivery.  It is difficult to imagine EA having anything less than a pivotal role there. The benefits of an Enterprise Architecture program are clear:…

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Architecture as eye candy

Sometimes, the architect is not really relevant. For architectural purists, this is a shocking thing to say.  To them, I’d say that teams can choose to ignore their architect.  In fact, in some situations, they are REQUIRED to ignore their architect.  (case in point to follow).  If that is the case, then creating a model,…

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Alas, We must differ…

Udi Dahan posted an interesting reply to a recent posting of mine.  In my post, I go into detail to present a scenario where two services are coupled because the business itself is coupled.  He disagreed with my design and offered an alternative.  I will discuss his alternative and show that our designs are similar…

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SOA and database coupling

What do you do if two enterprise services share the same database? I am running into this all the time.  As we work to break apart legacy applications, we need to recognize that ‘stovepipe’ applications are written from the perspective of ‘put everything we need in the local database.’  That means that we can get…

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declared, visible, and open coupling

Recently, I blogged that two coupled services should have declared, visible, and open coupling.  I was promptly asked how. First off, when you have two services, why would they be coupled?  Isn’t the POINT that your services are decoupled?  Sure.  That’s the point.  But the business doesn’t always work that way.  Sometimes, your services are…

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What would you say are the requirements that all services should meet?

I was called on, today, to justify a technical decision that was ‘smelly’ that resulted from one of my goals.  I’m not particularly surprised.  If I were to see a really odd implementation, I would first question the design, and then the requirements that fed it.  In this post, I will share the situation and…

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We do Scrumbut

EricGu has a great post on something he calls scrumbut.  It rings very true.  One of the teams I was in formerly did exactly this: Train everyone on Scrum Used “Scrum, but” with all the changes that work against agile principles like no customer on the project, and wildly long deliverable cycles Called it scrum Blamed…

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What SHOULD a sequence diagram show?

For most folks, a UML sequence diagram is something that is either (a) unnecessary, (b) clearly required and essential.  There is rarely a middle ground.  So when you create a diagram (whether by force or by choice) I’d like you to consider the audience, first and foremost.  What do you want to say to them?…

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What is the scope of a governance project?

One thing that I get to consider: what is the right way to govern large IT projects?  I’m in the fortunate postion of asking that question because I’m trying to figure out the correct and most useful role for Enterprise Architecture in providing input, insuring quality, and measuring progress towards goals through the process improvement…

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Speaking to "yes"

About ten years ago, a salesman used an old trick on me.  He asked a series of questions designed to elicit a ‘yes’ response.  He did this in front of a room of carefully selected prospects.  Gradually, one or two folks started responding to his questions, and finally, by the time his carefully crafted speech…

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