Change in UIElementRenderer behavior and update to UIElementRendererHelper

A while I back I posted about a UIElementRendererHelper class I had made to simplify life when mixing Silverlight and XNA Framework rendering in Windows Phone 7 Mango. Since then we’ve shipped an update or two to the tools and along with those has come a change in how UIElementRenderer works and as such an…

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Simplifying UIElementRenderer usage for full-page scenarios

UPDATE: Please see this new post regarding UIElementRendererHelper as it includes a newer version of the code that is better suited for Windows Phone 7.1 SDK RTM. With the new Windows Phone Developer Tools 7.1 Beta you can combine Silverlight and XNA Framework in a single app for Windows Phone. This is super powerful for…

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WPF Hosting for XNA Game Studio 4.0

A while back I wrote up a method for rendering XNA Game Studio 4.0 content inside of a WPF window. My method involved using a render target and doing a CPU transfer of those bits into a WriteableBitmap. This method had some pros and cons: Pros: Extremely simple in concept and in actual implementation. Enabled…

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MediaPlayer changes in XNA Game Studio 4.0 for Windows Phone

MediaPlayer, the interface for playing music on Windows Phone, is seeing some small tweaks that can affect applications. These changes are visible in the emulator that comes with the January update to the Windows Phone Developer Tools and will become more visible when the next update for Windows Phones rolls out through Zune. The short…

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‘using’ IDisposable objects

This isn’t fully game related, but I see so many people posting code on forums that looks like this: Stream stream = storageContainer.CreateFile("MyFile.txt"); StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(stream); writer.Write("Stuff"); writer.Close(); stream.Close(); I cringe at this sight. IDisposable is an interface that objects leveraging native handles or resources will almost always implement to ensure the native…

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Build-time content pipeline usage in Windows games

One of the problems that some folks have hit in XNA Game Studio 4.0 is not being able to use the build-time content pipeline assemblies in their Windows games. Generally this is desired when developers are trying to save out an object using the IntermediateSerializer so they can use the resulting XML as a template…

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What storage is right for me?

Developers moving across all three of the platforms supported by XNA Game Studio might find themselves working with their storage code to create a single codebase that works across all three. One of the main confusions can be the issue of what actually works on each of the platforms. Here’s a small table that quickly…

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Encoding and decoding images in XNA Game Studio 4.0

In previous releases of XNA Game Studio, there were the Texture2D.Save and Texture2D.FromFile methods for encoding and decoding images, but they only worked on Windows. In XNA GS 4.0, we introduced a few new methods: Texture2D.SaveAsPng, Texture2D.SaveAsJpeg, and Texture2D.FromStream. These methods replace the old Save and FromFile methods and are available across all three of…

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Don’t build more than what you need

One of the more abstract lessons I learned through making my AppWeek game was to build for the current project. I am, in my spare time, trying to build what one could call a 3D game engine. I’ve been (very) slowly building up code in various areas that will hopefully enable me to efficiently build…

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Don’t reinvent those wheels

Still continuing on about my AppWeek game, another bit that really helped me out was leveraging existing code for pieces of the game I didn’t really know how to make in a short time. While I do have a decent amount of generic code I’ve accumulated over the years, there are some pieces that I…

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