.NET Micro Framework 4.4 is now available!

The .NET Micro Framework team is pleased to announce the release of .NET Micro Framework 4.4. We fixed several long outstanding issues as well as improved the reliability of lwIP network stack and debugging experience through Visual Studio 2015. The 4.4 version also features several types from Windows.Devices namespace in the UWP API and experimental…


LLILUM roadmap and latest additions

We just finished pushing several changes that enable multi-threaded applications to work on M3 and M4 Cortex processors, including FP support. We are now supporting System.Threading namespace, on par with NET MF, and also System.Threading.Tasks. We will shortly add cancellation to Tasks and interrupt dispatching for peripherals. Please take a look at our roadmap and…


Coming Home

Looking at the blog history, it has been exactly two years since I last made an entry so it about time for a new update.  Let’s talk about why the team is back and what we are doing. Some months ago at the BUILD conference, Steve Teixeira (Director of Program Management on the IOT team)…

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Bicycle Computer #7 – Working with the Emulator when you have new Peripherals

This is the seventh in a series of articles demonstrating how someone with modest .NET programming capabilities can now write applications for embedded devices using the .NET Micro Framework and Visual Studio.  To jump to the initial article, click here. The project source code is posted on Codeplex.com and can be downloaded from http://netmfbikecomputer.codeplex.com/.  Remember,…

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Bicycle Computer #6 – More Complex Sensor Integration

This is the sixth in a series of articles demonstrating how someone with modest .NET programming capabilities can now write applications for embedded devices using the .NET Micro Framework and Visual Studio.  If you would like to start from the beginning, the first article can be found here.  This particular article is a little long…

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Bicycle Computer #5 – UI continued – Custom Controls

This is the fifth in a series of articles demonstrating how someone with modest .NET programming capabilities can now write applications for embedded devices using the .NET Micro Framework and Visual Studio. To jump to the initial article, click here.  I am still working on getting this project posted out to CodePlex or somehow made…

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Bicycle Computer #4 – UI continued – Fonts and Touch

This is the fourth in a series of articles demonstrating how someone with modest .NET programming capabilities can now write applications for embedded devices using the .NET Micro Framework and Visual Studio.  To jump to the initial article, click here.  I am still working on getting this project posted out to CodePlex or somehow made…

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Bicycle Computer #3 – Sensors and Sensor Integration

This is the third in a series of articles demonstrating how someone with modest .NET programming capabilities can now write applications for embedded devices using the .NET Micro Framework and Visual Studio.  The first of the series can be found here.  Just as a reminder, if you would like to dive into more detail on…

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Bicycle Computer #2 – Getting the Project Started

This is the second in a series of articles demonstrating how someone with modest .NET programming capabilities can now write applications for embedded devices using the .NET Micro Framework and Visual Studio. You can get to the first article of this series by following this link. In this second article, we will start to lay…

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