LLILUM SDK is now available for Visual Studio 2015

We published today the first cut of the Llilum SDK for Visual Studio 2015. The build and installation experience is still a bit cumbersome, but you can now build and debug Llium code entirely in Visual Studio 2015. We also started cleaning up the LLVM bitcode generation by providing a managed wrapper for LLVM3.6.1, fixed…


Bicycle Computer #7 – Working with the Emulator when you have new Peripherals

This is the seventh in a series of articles demonstrating how someone with modest .NET programming capabilities can now write applications for embedded devices using the .NET Micro Framework and Visual Studio.  To jump to the initial article, click here. The project source code is posted on Codeplex.com and can be downloaded from http://netmfbikecomputer.codeplex.com/.  Remember,…

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Bicycle Computer #6 – More Complex Sensor Integration

This is the sixth in a series of articles demonstrating how someone with modest .NET programming capabilities can now write applications for embedded devices using the .NET Micro Framework and Visual Studio.  If you would like to start from the beginning, the first article can be found here.  This particular article is a little long…

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Bicycle Computer #5 – UI continued – Custom Controls

This is the fifth in a series of articles demonstrating how someone with modest .NET programming capabilities can now write applications for embedded devices using the .NET Micro Framework and Visual Studio. To jump to the initial article, click here.  I am still working on getting this project posted out to CodePlex or somehow made…

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Bicycle Computer #4 – UI continued – Fonts and Touch

This is the fourth in a series of articles demonstrating how someone with modest .NET programming capabilities can now write applications for embedded devices using the .NET Micro Framework and Visual Studio.  To jump to the initial article, click here.  I am still working on getting this project posted out to CodePlex or somehow made…

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Bicycle Computer #3 – Sensors and Sensor Integration

This is the third in a series of articles demonstrating how someone with modest .NET programming capabilities can now write applications for embedded devices using the .NET Micro Framework and Visual Studio.  The first of the series can be found here.  Just as a reminder, if you would like to dive into more detail on…

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Bicycle Computer #2 – Getting the Project Started

This is the second in a series of articles demonstrating how someone with modest .NET programming capabilities can now write applications for embedded devices using the .NET Micro Framework and Visual Studio. You can get to the first article of this series by following this link. In this second article, we will start to lay…

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Bicycle Computer #1 – Introduction

Embedded development has historically been a distinct skillset from development for the desktop, servers, and web. While the same programming models and tools can be used in desktop, server, web, and even cloud applications, embedded software development required developers with specialized skills often using different languages and tools. With embedded applications increasingly moving to standard…

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New article on using Interop posted

I’ve just posted an article on using interop in .NET Micro Framework V3.0. Abstract The .NET Micro framework provides a rich level of support for embedded systems development from handling interrupts on GPIO pins to talking to hardware on an SPI or I2C bus. Unfortunately, sometimes, that’s not quite enough. For example, an A/D converter…

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Canucks at PDC – .NET Micro Framework

Joey deVilla posted a video with .Net MF Program Manager Jim Mateer at PDC where they talk all about .Net MF and donuts. http://blogs.msdn.com/cdndevs/archive/2008/11/01/canucks-at-pdc-net-micro-framework.aspx  

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