Best of both worlds: one researcher’s dual approach

  Who walks away from success? In his decade with Microsoft Research, Sumit Gulwani enjoyed a self-described “blissful” tenure, co-authoring more than 100 papers and giving dozens of keynotes and lectures—so why, then, would he leave? “Research alone is not a sustainable growth model,” said Gulwani in a recent interview. “If we want to do…


2014 Microsoft Research Awards for SEIF announced

With the announcement of the 2014 winners of the Microsoft Research Awards for the Software Engineering Innovations Foundation (SEIF), I can’t help but reflect on the depth and breadth of research supported by Microsoft Research. Over the past few years, SEIF has not only sponsored research into core software engineering challenges but has also funded…


2013 SEIF Awards Support Researchers in Software Engineering

Each year, the Software Engineering Innovation Foundation (SEIF) awards US$25,000 grants to support academic research in software engineering technologies, tools, practices, and teaching methods. SEIF is supported by Microsoft Research Connections Computer Science in conjunction with the Research in Software Engineering Group (RiSE). This year, we were joined by the Microsoft Technology Policy Group. SEIF…


Rallying Women to STEM Careers

We know our science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) workforce is crucial to America’s innovative capacity and global competitiveness. Yet women are vastly underrepresented in these fields. The 2009 US Census reveals that although women fill close to half of all jobs in the country’s economy, they hold less than 25 percent of the STEM…


Inspiring Computer Science Students in Our Backyard

As Microsoft’s “point person” for increasing women’s participation in computing, I am passionate about attracting talented young women to careers in computer science. Perhaps you’ve seen these statistics, which underscore the need: The percentage of computer science graduates who are women has declined from 37 percent in 1985 to 18 percent in 2009. (Source: http://www.ncwit.org/scorecard)…


.NET Gadgeteer Stirs Excitement in British Schools

Youngsters love gadgets. So wouldn’t it be great if they could build their own, and at school? This is exactly what more than 70 British students, ages 13 to 16, are doing by using .NET Gadgeteer. On January 30, they gathered at the Microsoft Research Cambridge Lab to present their final projects and celebrate the…


Addressing the Need for More Women in Computer Science Programs

Last year, women accounted for only 14 percent of computer science college graduates in the United States, according to the Computing Research Association. That’s down from 35 percent in 1985, despite U.S. Labor Department statistics that show computing to be among the fastest-growing, most in-demand fields, with too few qualified candidates to fill the available…


No CS Student Left Behind

Computer Science Education Week (CSEdWeek), which took place this year from December 4 to 10 in the United States, is a celebration of computer science education. And while it’s a great idea to devote a week to recognizing the importance of this field, it’s a topic that demands year-round attention all over the world. That’s…


Unlocking Academic Success with Frame Games for Learning

It began with a simple question: “Why can’t students earn digital rewards for being awesome?” A research group comprised of university faculty, staff, and students at the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) decided to find out. The team delved into the everyday travails of college life—from academia to social activities—and developed a real-world game, Just…