Kinect Sign Language Translator – part 2

Today, we have the second part of a two-part blog posted by program managers in Beijing and Redmond respectively—second up, Stewart Tansley: When Microsoft Research shipped the first official Kinect for Windows software development kit (SDK) beta in June 2011, it was both an ending and a beginning for me. The thrilling accomplishment of rapidly and…


Kinect Sign Language Translator – part 1

Today, we have the first part of a two-part blog posted by program managers in Beijing and Redmond respectively—first up, Guobin Wu: I consider myself incredibly lucky to be the program manager of the Kinect Sign Language Translator project. There are more than 20 million people in China who are hard of hearing, and an…


SEIF issues 2014 awards RFP

Today, October 29, 2013, the Microsoft Research Connections Computer Science Group—in conjunction with the Research in Software Engineering Group (RiSE), the Sensing and Energy Research Group, and Global Foundation Services—is officially issuing the request for proposals for the Software Engineering Innovation Foundation (SEIF) 2014 awards. You’ll find more information below on the 2014 RFP. This…


Students develop analytics engine for the Lab of Things

The Lab of Things (LoT) may sound like something you’d find in a sci-fi movie, but it is a lot more practical than that: it’s a research platform that makes it easy to deploy interconnected devices in multiple homes, then share your individual research data with other investigators, turning it all into a large-scale study….


Bringing the heavens into the schoolhouse

In the five years since Microsoft Research initially launched the WorldWide Telescope (WWT), the product’s many features have been put to a variety of uses. Today in Chongqing, China, we saw yet another first for WorldWide Telescope: the unveiling of the first WWT-driven planetarium in China. The 8-meter dome installation is at the Shixinlu primary…


eScience and Cloud Computing in Beijing

I’m in Beijing for the tenth annual Microsoft eScience Workshop, which runs from October 22 to 25. As in the past, the workshop takes place at the same time and in the same location as the IEEE International Conference on eScience. No coincidence, of course—why not take advantage of all that collected eScience brain power? This…


Windows Azure for Research at UNICAMP

In today’s world of data-intensive scientific research, cloud computing offers immense value. Here in Brazil, for example, researchers are working on a variety of environmental and urban studies projects that demand a highly scalable and flexible resource infrastructure—exactly what cloud computing on Windows Azure offers. So here’s some good news for Brazilian researchers: on October…


Hopeful for the Future of Women in Computing

Sitting on a plane heading back to the Pacific Northwest, I’m reflecting on the week I just spent in Minneapolis—a week of inspiration and impact at the Grace Hopper Celebration (GHC) of Women in Computing. I’m thinking about the pertinence of this year’s GHC theme, “Think Big, Drive Forward,” and how our 260-strong contingent of…


Thinking big about women in computing

I can’t imagine a more perfect theme for the 2013 Grace Hopper Celebration (GHC) of Women in Computing than “Think Big, Drive Forward.” It’s a message that speaks to me personally, as a new employee of Microsoft who has been thinking big things about my own career and driving ideas forward through events like GHC,…


Hopping to Minneapolis to celebrate women in computing

Going to a major conference is always fun. It’s an opportunity to see old friends and make new ones, to network with experts, and to be exposed to fresh ideas and trends. All those benefits hold true for the Grace Hopper Celebration (GHC) for Women in Computing, the Anita Borg Institute’s annual conference on women’s…