Single SignOn is easy, Single Signout is not

Single Sign In relies on the token issuer holding on to a cookie, which tells it about the user identity after the first signin. The issuer can then respond to a request for token in whatever protocol it came in (WSFed, SAML, OpendIDConnect, etc.). Single Signout requires that the token server holds both a list…

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Azure AD client certificate rollover

This Azure AD sample¬†shows how to use OAuth2 Client Credential flow with an X509 certificate for authentication. Here is a procedure I use to periodically rollover the certificates. In order to maintain continuous ability to authenticate a client you will want to define at least two certificates so that as you replace one, the other…

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Changing user password in Azure AD using GraphAPI

The following pertains to a very specific scenario: You use Azure AD for some applications (e.g. Office365), but… …one of your applications does NOT use Azure AD (yet). It has its own authentication store and method (e.g. forms authn). However, you want to keep the application’s credentials in sync with AAD. Basically, allow same signon…

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Passive is good!

Some time back I wrote about avoiding handling of credentials (creation/maintenance/verification of user names, passwords, pins, etc.) in your own application code, but rather delegating that functionality to a specialized, external identity provider (IdP; http://blogs.msdn.com/b/mrochon/archive/2014/12/02/should-an-application-handle-user-credentials.aspx). This aversion should apply to even collection of credentials (e.g. asking the user for user name/password). Even that role should be delegated…

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Using OAuth2 with SOAP

I started at Microsoft when SOAP was all the rage, before there was such a thing as WCF. So it is with some nostalgia that I tried to combine one of latest technologies: Universal App Platform (UAP) with SOAP using OAuth2 protocol for authentication. One possible application of this approach would be for folks who…

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ServiceBus, Azure AD, OAuth and Shared Access Signature

Most Service Bus examples use symmetric keys directly in applications needing access to the ServiceBus, usually as part of the connection string. That approach does not work so well with widely distributed applications, e.g. desktop or mobile apps. Another important Azure service becomes very useful here: Azure Active Directory. One of the goals of AAD is to provide role and…

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Should an application handle user credentials?

I think the answer is ‘no’ or ‘only under special circumstances’ (see Exceptions below) but would be interested in your comments. By ‘own credential management’ I mean have own store of user names AND passwords and code to challenge users for the credentials, create them, reset passwords, etc. The alternative I am recommending is for the application to use…

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ASP.NET WebForms OAuth2 multi-tenant resource and WPF client

Most published WebAPI samples (e.g. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/azure/dn646737.aspx) are based on the MVC and OWin infrastructure, which is not available in WebForms applications. Following is a custom implementation of an OAuth2 access token handler presented by a WPF rich client application. The WPF is responsible for managing the OAuth code grant flow to obtain the token and present…

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Using WS-Federation with Windows Store and .NET rich clients

In general, rich client apps use OAuth flow to obtain authorization tokens to a web service. However, that flow may not be available from the authentication servers. In the following I am using an alternative approach: WS-Federation, well supported by ASP.NET web services. The solution consists of a web service, often used to provide REST…

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