Tatoo Detective


When a Microsoftie moves to a different group we typically take one of our machines with us. I opted to take my four-year-old desktop as that meant I also took my flat panel monitors, to which I have grown rather attached. As I frequently work outside of my office I requested a (decked out, natch) laptop. Me being me, I personalized it a bit:

My new laptop sports an 'I'd rather be testing' tatoo

How do you like the tatoo? <g/>

And did you notice it’s a Mac? (A fifteen-inch MacBook Pro, to be exact.)

One of my projects now is figuring out how to do cross-platform test automation. Write Once Run Everywhere. It seems possible to me. We’ll see.

Michael Bolton’s advice when I asked whether he knew of anyone working in this space was “Humans do cross-platform testing out-of-the-box. Do you really need to automate?” I likely will end up automating at least some of my tests. I am however starting with the assumption that all of my testing will be manual and then I will selectively choose which tests to automate, as opposed to assuming everything will be automated and fall back to manual testing when a specific test turns out to be difficult to automate. I am curious to see how it goes.

So why am I testing on a Mac? The answer to that will have to wait a while. More info as soon as I can give it!

Comments (8)

  1. I suspect I know what you’re going to test on Macs. If I’m right, it’s probably best that I don’t post that here, but I’m really looking forward to that. 🙂

  2. Michael if you need a hand count on me 😉

  3. Ankur Jain says:

    Hi Michael,

    Can you elaborate more on what you wish to do with test automation? It being my area of interest I would like to explore and see if i could be of any help.

    Visit the blog http://mercuryquicktestprofessional.blogspot.com to see my little contribution to automation testing world.

    Regards,

    Ankur

  4. Ankur,

    I’ll have a read through your blog. Things I’m looking for in test automation include: writing tests in terms of semantic actions not implementation specifics; writing a test once and running it across multiple platforms (e.g., Windows and Mac); sharing a high percentage of my automation stack across platforms; the ability to drop down into any layer of the stack (e.g., a specific implementation of a semantic action, individual UI widgets) at any point in a test case.

  5. Ivolved says:

    So I’m assuming the reason you’re cross platform testing on a Mac has something to do with WPF/E 1.1?

  6. Ivolved says:

    Interesting…the plot thickens!