Running a troubleshooter from the command line

On TechNet you’ll find an article the describes the command line usage for a tool called the Microsoft Support Diagnostic Tool (MSDT.EXE), which you can use to launch a Windows Troubleshooting Pack from (obviously) the command line.  The article has all the details, but I thought I’d take a moment today to give folks the…

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Working with devices

I talked to several folks at Tech Ed who wanted to know if it was possible to work with devices and do something like an uninstall/reinstall using a Troubleshooting Pack.  Yes, you absolutely can!  In fact, there are two ways you can accomplish this, so I’ll show you both. Method 1: Reuse the Windows “Devices”…

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Thank you Tech Ed 2010

Tech Ed 2010 has come and gone.  What an experience!  Friday was a travel day for me, which I expect is the case for many of you.  I’m writing this post from the the Dallas/Fort-Worth Airport at gate C20 waiting for my flight back to Seattle.  I’ve got an hour to kill, so I thought…

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Windows Troubleshooting Platform Quick Reference

Hi Everyone, I’ve created a handy quick reference for the CmdLets, interactions, and extension points provided by the Windows Troubleshooting Platform.  I sometimes forget all the little nuances and have to go look up stuff on MSDN, but no longer.  Just print this sheet out, tack it to your wall, and you’ll always have Windows…

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Windows Summit 2010

Go check out all the awesome content available for System Builders, ISVs, and IHVs at the Windows Summit 2010, including an introduction to how you can use the Windows Troubleshooting Platform to save support costs, presented by me! -mb

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Sample DxDiag Troubleshooting Pack

One of the questions I’m often asked is how to use existing tools with the Windows Troubleshooting Platform, and how to use the log files produced by those tools.  I’ve built a simple demo that’ll show you how to do this.  This example runs DxDiag, interprets the log, and displays some next steps to the user….

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Windows Troubleshooting Platform meta-pack example

Today I thought I’d briefly touch on a new troubleshooting concept– the meta-pack.  A meta-pack is a logical grouping of multiple Windows Troubleshooting Packs which can then be executed as one.  You can use a meta-pack to group similar troubleshooting tasks or to extend the functionality of an existing diagnostic without having to modify the…

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How to call .NET and Win32 methods from PowerShell (and your troubleshooting packs)

Every once in a while I run into a problem that I just don’t know how to solve using PowerShell directly.  Fortunately, PowerShell has great interoperability with other .NET code, so if you’re already familiar with VB.NET or C# you’ll never be lost.  One of my “bad habits” is to use .NET methods instead of…

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Change the troubleshooting experience to meet your needs

If you use any of the inbox diagnostics on Windows 7 you’ll notice that they’re designed to find and fix a series of problems, but if you look at the maintenance diagnostic you’ll see it sets a slightly different tone.  Rather than address traditional “problems” it takes care of some common maintenance tasks, which doesn’t…

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Gaming with the Windows Troubleshooting Platform

Today we’re going to dive straight into a fun, simple project; creating a multiple choice trivia style game using the Windows Troubleshooting Platform.  We’re skipping the architecture, applicability, and design discussions; instead we’ll build this simple game that’ll run in our troubleshooting pack.  Let’s get to it!  Before we get started, let’s go thru the…

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