XmlSerialization of DateTime in .NET Framework 2.0

I have seen numerous blog and newsgroup posts about how XmlSerialization and ASMX WebServices serialize DateTime in v1.0 and v1.1 of the framework.  Well, I have some good news, bad news and good bad news for you.   Good news:  We fixed it. Bad news: If you worked around it then you might be broken…

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Migrating .NET Remoting to WCF (and even ASMX!)

This is a long post so I’ll summarize my findings up front.   Summary:   Following the .NET Remoting guidance enables quick and painless upgrade to WCF A single interface can be decorated to support .NET Remoting, WCF and ASMX The service implementation does not need to change at all to support all three platforms…

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Shhh… Don’t Tell Anyone but I am using .NET Remoting: Part 4 – Wrap it up

Here is the final trick.  And those of you who have read the series have waited a while for this final post.  (Sorry for the delay.)  Programming against an interface gives you the consistent programming model across the various distributed platforms but abstracting the code that creates the proxy is also critical to hide the…

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What’s New in .NET Remoting for .NET Framework 2.0

A little self-promotion never hurt anyone… Some new MSDN TV content has recently been made available on the new features of .NET Remoting for .NET Framework 2.0.  Enjoy! http://msdn.microsoft.com/msdntv/episode.aspx?xml=episodes/en/20050120NETMT/manifest.xml Matt Tavis shows some new features and code examples in .NET Remoting in .NET Framework 2.0, including the new IpcChannel, the secure TcpChannel, and Version Tolerant…

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Shhh… Don’t Tell Anyone but I am using .NET Remoting: Part 3 – Use interfaces and serializable types in your contract

Now that you expose the your remote object through a CLR interface, that interface should limit itself to interfaces and serializable types as parameters and return values.  This guideline is really just an additional follow-on to rule one about using only CLR interfaces. Let’s expand on the original example from part 1.  The original interface…

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Shhh… Don’t Tell Anyone but I am using .NET Remoting: Part 2 – Consider making your implementation internal

In Part 1 it was suggested to use only interfaces to program against your remoted object.  Another consideration for enforcing the correct usage of your remote object is to limit access to the implementation except through the interface that you defined for it. You can do this by marking the implementation internal so that it is…

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Shhh… Don’t Tell Anyone but I am using .NET Remoting: Part 1 – Use CLR Interfaces

One of the easiest ways to avoid locking yourself into .NET Remoting is to avoid exposing its most infamous type in your contract:  MarshalByRefObject (MBRO).  To marshal object references in .NET Remoting your type needs to inherit from MBRO but that doesn’t mean your contract needs to expose types that inherit from MBRO. Use CLR Interfaces for…

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Shhh… Don’t Tell Anyone but I am using .NET Remoting: A Series

So you’ve heard about SOA and Indigo and the future of distributed application development on .NET.  You’ve even seen the long-running discussion of our guidance on Richard Turner’s blog.  You are now asking yourself: But how can I use .NET Remoting today but be prepared for Indigo?  Hopefully, I can answer all of your questions…

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Deprecating the SoapFormatter

Now that I have your attention… We are seriously considering deprecating the SoapFormatter in .NET Framework 2.0.  It is the nexus of a whole host of serialization issues and implies a promise of interop that it does not and will not live up to.  It also does not support generics.  Additionally, those of you interested in…

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TechEd Europe

I’ll be going to TechEd Europe to give a few talks.  If you are interested in any of the following then add them to your schedule: Wed 8:30  CTS201  Web Service, XML Serialization and Networking in .NET Framework 2.0 A preview of some of the cool new features in the Technology Preview Thur 8:30  CTS300  Prescriptive…

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