Windows Home Server – It’s alive!

The new PC I ordered to run Windows Home Server arrived last night, and I’m happily fiddling with it.

Despite waiting far longer than Cyberpower originally estimated to ship it, the box itself seems decent enough and booted Windows Home Server from the CD on the first try. Total cost for the box: $470 before shipping. I could have gotten it for a lot less, but I upgraded a few key items:

  • Motherboard that supports 6 SATA drives

  • Case that holds 6 3.5″ drives

  • Dual core AMD 3800+ to ensure enough horsepower when/if the box ever runs Media Center functionality concurrently

  • 160GB hard drive, rather than the less expensive 80GB.

It’s a bit noisy with the four case fans, but since there’s a digital thermometer on the case I can experiment with disabling some of the fans while keeping the case cool enough.

Tonights task: Installing the two 500GB hard drives I purchased for less than $280 at Newegg.

I haven’t yet installed the Windows Home Server client side software on my household machines. I’m holding off a few days, when a newer build should be available.

Comments (4)

  1. I hope you wrote this using your best Gene Wilder impersonation – :o)

  2. Lutz says:

    I thought WHS needed to be a dedicated box that couldn’t run something like Media Center? I have one machine that I’m deciding on whether to use as aWHS or MC. But if it can do both, that would be awesome. Can you give me any hints as to whether this id possible?

  3. Matt Pietrek says:

    >I’m deciding on whether to use as aWHS or MC. But if it can do both, that would be awesome.

    This has been heavily voted for by internal folks. 🙂

    WHS is based on Windows Server 2003. There’s some info here:

    and here:

  4. Norman Diamond says:

    From a brief look at the referenced web site ( it looks[*] like you need a MC in order to learn what a WHS is.

    [* It only looks that way, doesn’t sound that way, when some silly viewer uses a server that doesn’t have a sound card.]