IT Skills & Talent In Canada – Myths and Realities – Part 1


Working in today’s IT industry comes with a variety of challenges, especially in these tough economic times.  Jobs are becoming more complex, employers expectations are high and employees need more than just technical skills to grow their careers.  I had a chance to sit down with Shane Schick from itWorldCanada to discuss the state of the IT Profession in Canada.  We discussed several “myths” and industry perceptions on the IT skills shortage and lack of IT talent in Canada.

We chatted about what the IT industry as a whole can do to help close the gap between employers and employees expectations.  The key is driving the right demand for IT skills, while meeting this demand with the right supply of talent.  We also highlighted some of the things that Microsoft Canada is doing to address these issues – such as Techdays, EnergizeIT and the Ignite Your Career Series.

Shane and I divided our chat into the discussion of 4 “IT profession myths”.  Shane even had actual comments from his readers that we used as the focal point of the discussion.

Here is the first part of the series, titled “IT Doesn’t Matter” (in Silverlight).  Check it out, let me know what your thoughts on the topic are.

 

I will post parts 2, 3 and 4 later this week.

Comments (11)

  1. steve.syfuhs says:

    I think one of the reasons it’s difficult to go from a bottom-rung cost centre to a dynamic-strategic investment has to do with a lack of information.  It’s almost ironic.

    C-level execs are unaware of what we can do.  And that comes down to the fault of the CIO or whoever is in charge of IT.  Any manager should be thinking of a way to make their group an investment, not how to reduce their cost footprint.  My favorite example of is this is identity integration.

    What costs more initially?  Building an integrated system that synchronizes user accounts across all systems, allowing for SSO capabilities, or hiring 2 help desk people (possibly in India) to handle password resets?

    It’s far better to the company to synchronize the systems, but cheaper to hire.  It’s the job of the CIO to recognize this, and sell it to the C-level.

    If the CIO can’t, he’s not doing a good job.  Too many people who just put out fires are put in charge, and aren’t willing to change.  If the CIO can’t believe in a strategic IT department, the entire department fails.

    When this happens, all IT departments in all companies are affected.  “Why should we do that?  Company XYZ didn’t…”

  2. (This is part 2 of a 4 part series, you can read the first post here ) Here is the second part of my

  3. (Cross-Post.  This is part 2 of a 4 part series, you can read the first post here ) Here is the

  4. (This is part 3 of a 4 part series, you can read the first post here ) Here is the second part of my

  5. (This is part 3 of a 4 part series, you can read the first post here ) Here is the second part of my

  6. itWorldCanada conducted an interview with Mark Relph , the evangelism lead in  Canada. They looked

  7. (This is part 4 of a 4 part series, you can read the first post here ) Here is the final part of my discussion

  8. (This is part 4 of a 4 part series, you can read the first post here ) Here is the final part of my discussion

  9. News says:

    itWorldCanada conducted an interview with Mark Relph , the evangelism lead in  Canada. They looked