Thought and direct experience

Being wrong, and become aware of that, are two different instances of reality. For me, the conjunction of those instances is a joyful experience. For example, I was wrong, very wrong, about who can possibly be able to know something and teach it to others. It is good to know that I was wrong. I just recalled this because of a question about the role of a Scrum Master and direct experience on code design:

Full conversation: Honestly Curious.

«…I used to think —decades into my past— that “the only way” —careful! Bigotry alarms at full capacity here— somebody could ever know and ever teach about something is by the sole means of direct experience. Period. Simple. End of discussion.

Nowadays, —since about 28 years ago—, I reflect that the subject matter of knowing and the subject matter of being able to teach or help others turned out to be not that simple. And the discussion is wide open, and the debate keeps very active among authorities on those subject matters.

There are cases where somebody can, in fact, learn a lot from the experiences reported by others and by pure sheer thought based on sound theoretical schemes. So, now I think that a fully functional Scrum Master —or anybody, for that matter— can, in fact, help others effectively without the sole means of direct experience.

Does it make sense?»

Comments (0)

Skip to main content