Last Week on DirectX Shader Compiler (2017-05-02)

“A Day Late Edition” Support for the next revision of DXIL is starting to trickle in, along with code generation improvements and a change in how htan(-inf) and htan(inf) work. DXBC didn’t have a built-in intrinsic for this, and the expansion produced NaNs. Two new SM 6.1 specifics were added last week. Barycentrics ViewID The…

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Last Week on DirectX Shader Compiler (2017-04-25)

This was a very forward-looking week. SM 6.1, DXIL 1.1 and HLSL 2017. Disabled CSE. Doing the optimization is straightforward; undoing it for profit is hard. We’re leaving this to back-ends, where knowledge of register pressure can be applied. More tests, more test fixes == improved driver conformance. Much prep work for libraries. I want…

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Last Week on DirectX Shader Compiler (2017-04-18)

As always, lots of goodness went into the compiler. Here are some highlights. – Constant arrays are now hoisted by default from locals into initialized globals when possible, making their const-ness and reusability more obvious. – We’ve enabled AppVeyor on pull requests and commits. You’ll see the status on the main readme as well as…

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Last Week on DirectX Shader Compiler (2017-04-11)

Starting this to keep track of interesting developments in the shader compiler. The biggest news was the release of Windows 10 Creators Update. The SDK includes dxil.dll, which is required to build DXIL shaders that can run without experimental mode being set, as well as a version of dxc and dxcompiler. The dxc and dxcompiler…

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Fresh Bits – Windows 10 Creators Update and Creators Update SDK

Head over to the Building Apps blog and check out today’s updates: Windows 10 Creators Update is now available. You can wait for it to be offered as an update, or you can update now. Creators Update SDK is also available. In addition to all the highlights you’ll be reading about, the SDK will also…

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DirectX Compiler APIs

If you are used to building HLSL with fxc.exe, your build process can now use dxc.exe to compile shaders with the new DirectX Shader compiler. This is convenient for standalone projects. Games, middleware and asset pipelines will often have a need to do this multiple times and/or from source code that doesn’t exist as a file…

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HLSL Console Tools

If you’ve already followed the instructions in the README.md to get started, congratulations! We hope you have some fun on this with us. One of the things that may have surprised you is the use of a “special” console, the HLSL Console, which you should have on your desktop if everything went well and you…

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Building the DirectX Compiler Sources

The README.md file in the repo for the DirectX HLSL Compiler provides the steps on how to build the project. I thought it would be interesting to share some of our journey about how we landed where we currently are, and what we think moving forward looks like. The obvious starting point for this project…

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Next generation DirectX Shader Compiler

My last post on HLSL development was a while ago. I’m happy to announce in this post that the code is currently hosted on a GitHub repo at https://github.com/Microsoft/DirectXShaderCompiler. Check the announcement on the DirectX Developer Blog earlier this week for more details. This is very exciting to my team, because we finally get to…

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PIX on Windows (beta) released

Tools are an incredibly important part of our work. Great tools allow us to look at the systems we’re developing, get a holistic sense of what’s going on and then zoom into the details we care about. Today PIX on Windows announced its beta release. If you work with D3D12 on Windows, you definitely owe it to yourself…

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