Our sessions at the PDC …

Now we can finally blog about our PDC sessions. We have been working for more then a year on this data language integration stuff and it is quite exciting to be able to talk about it publicly. Here are the sessions involved. They are all tied together by a common theme. They are all part…

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To rent or to buy a house, some more evidence of my unpopular thesis …

I discussed this topic in a previous post http://blogs.msdn.com/lucabol/archive/2004/07/30/202394.aspx and I received a number of emails telling me how crazy I was even speculating that, at the current juncture, it may be more convinient to rent than to buy a house. This week The Economist runs a piece where they make the same exact claim. House…

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Compiler trivia: const, operators and being nice to the compiler

This is a question that came up on our internal alias. I thought it might be generally interesting to illustrate how the compiler picks operators. Here is the original issue. This code compiles fine: UInt64 vUInt641 = UInt64.MaxValue;const int  vInt2 = 1432765098;int res = (int)(vUInt641 – vInt2); But this code generates a compile error: UInt64…

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Nullable trilogy part III: Nullable<T> as type parameter in a generic class

Another commonly asked question relates to the behavior of Nullable<T> when used as type parameter to instantiate a generic class. It might be surprising that comparing such a parameter to null gives always false as a result. As it turns out, this is not related to Nullable<T>, but it is a result of how generics…

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Nullable trilogy part II: a == b -> a>=b && a <=b ?

A question that often comes up when we discuss Nullable<T>  is about the anti-symmetric property. This property states that if a==b then a>=b and a<=b. If a and b are null then this property is not satisfied in the current design as the result of >= and <= is always false when one of the parameters is null….

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New C# things happening…

Express yourself about this DCR: http://blogs.msdn.com/scottno/archive/2005/01/19/356347.aspx Partecipate to the C# language chat: http://blogs.msdn.com/scottno/archive/2005/01/19/356358.aspx That’s it.

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Nullable trilogy Part I: why not just SQL?

This is the first of a weekly three part serie of posts about Nullable<T>. In these posts I want to describe the reasons behind three design choices:1. Why not just use SQL semantics for null?2. Why null == null doesn’t imply null >= null and null <= null?3. Why inside a generic class with a…

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