SQL Server 2005: Execution Context

This post is based on an old presentation I gave several years back. A video of the presentation used to be available here, but today I couldn’t get it to work, so I am attempting to make available most of the information from the presentation within this post. Keep in mind that the demo associated with…

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Basic SQL Server Security concepts: ownership, CONTROL, TAKE OWNERSHIP

I realized today that while I have discussed earlier object permissions, I have not gone into the details of object ownership. I want to cover the following here: ownership of objects, how it can be changed, and the relatively new permission CONTROL (introduced in SQL Server 2005). Ownership: This should be pretty clear – the owner of an object is…

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Basic SQL Server Security concepts: SIDs, orphaned users, and loginless users

I am grouping here two topics (orphaned users and loginless users) that are actually very different, but I have often seen confusion between them, so I am covering them together in an attempt to dispel that confusion. In a previous discussion of logins and users, I pointed out that the way a login gets mapped to users…

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Basic SQL Server Security concepts - ownership chaining: good and evil; schemas

At some point during SQL Server’s history, its designers must have confronted the following problem: how to give someone permission to see parts of a table without giving him any permission on the table? Slices of a table are easily defined using views, so the problem becomes one of giving SELECT permission on a view without granting a SELECT permission on the…

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Basic SQL Server Security concepts - permissions and special principals: sa, dbo, guest

In a previous post, I talked about the various types of principals in SQL Server. Let’s have a further look in this post at permissions and at some of the hardcoded principals that ship with any installation of SQL Server. Permissions are what allow principals (logins, users, roles, etc) to perform (or not perform) activities in SQL Server. Permissions…

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Basic SQL Server Security concepts - logins, users, and principals

In this post I’d like to talk about some basic SQL Server security concepts. SQL Server has a less common design that can confuse users familiar with the security features of other software products, such as Microsoft Windows OS; in particular, the difference between logins and users is one that seems to invariably confuse most new SQL Server…

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