Error: Visual Studio project or solution appears to be under source control, but isn’t…


The following question was raised on an aspadvice (product-vsnet) list this morning:


“Hey there, I moved a solution over from one dev box to another. The old box was connected to source control, however, the new one is not. Whenever I open up the project on the new box, I get an error stating that it believes the project to be under control, but cannot connect. I have removed all of the Source Safe files, but still get the error…“


For the record (and google-ability), the message that this Visual Studio user encountered was (probably):


“The solution appears to be under source control, but its binding information cannot be found. It is possible that the MSSCCPRJ.SCC file or another item that holds the source control settings for the solution, has been deleted. Because it is not possible to recover this missing information automatically, the projects whose bindings are missing will be treated as not under source control.”


The help topic for this error message, which advises you to ‘correct this error’ by adding the solution to source control, is not too helpful.  My bad.  Hopefully, the following information (from my response to the aspadvice email) will make up for this lapse.


This is a known issue and we’re working on implementing a sensible fix in the next version of Visual Studio. In the meantime, you can workaround this issue in a few ways. You can:



  1. Ignore this message (because it doesn’t really matter).

  2. Add the solution to source control as a new item.
       –OR–
    Use File|Source Control|Change Source Control dialog box to bind it to a new location in your scc database.

  3. Prevent the message from ever again appearing on your desktop by manually editing the solution and project files to remove all source-control references… Stuff like the following strings:



    • SccProjectName = “SAK”

    • SccLocalPath = “SAK”

    • SccAuxPath = “SAK”

    • SccProvider = “SAK”

Option #1 is recommended. I add option #2 for completeness only. If you go with option #3, proceed with caution.


For background information on source control bindings, see What is a Source Control Binding?


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Il presente posting viene fornito “così come é”, senza garanzie, e non conferisce alcun diritto.


Comments (31)

  1. shouldn’t #3 should really say: "Use the Change Source Control option to unbind from source control"?

    editing those files manually seems like an awful way to get around a problem that can be done with a few button clicks.

  2. Speaking of such, what is the proper way to remove an item from source control?

    Example: .Text

    Once a month or so, I would like to take what I have done, remove it from source control, zip it up, and then re-eable source control.

    Is this possible?

    Thanks,

    -Scott

  3. Derick, My workaround steps assume that the solution/project was not unbound from source control prior to being moved to the new computer. I didn’t think it safe to assume that the user even had access to the original computer so I didn’t suggest that he unbind there.

    Thus, I document how to work around this error message if you see it, not how to avoid it in the first place.

    What you’re suggesting (and you’re absolutely right!) is that I should document how to avoid this error message in the first place.

    This leads me to Scott’s question, which I’ve answered in a separate post:

    http://weblogs.asp.net/korbyp/posts/44236.aspx

  4. Derick Bailey says:

    With VS.NET, at least, it’s pretty easy to unbind from source control on the new system, and not ever have to touch the old one.

  5. Marcelo says:

    I tried it, but couldnt quite get through step 3. Which files do I have to edit? Thanks

  6. The solution file (*.sln) and the project file (*.*proj).

  7. Marcelo says:

    Rather, I actually edited the files and removed all text which I found was related to Source Safe, and I still get the warning dialog. What am I missing here?

  8. Oh. In VS.NET, click File, click Source Control, and then click Change Source Control. In the Change Source Control Dialog box, select the solution and project and then click Unbind.

  9. Ken says:

    How about in cases where I’m getting this message when the project is SUPPOSED to be under source control and is from the developer that established the project? When I attempt to open the project on my own computer, I get the error message above. The Source Control option is NOT available off the File menu (in fact there doesn’t seem to be any way for me to modify source control settings for the project). This project is in a Web folder (by the way, we use File Share to access it) and much of the code is from an original ASP (not .Net) project. The project file itself is brand new (under VS.Net 2003). This is exasperating since most of the info I find (including this Weblog) is focussed on people getting rid of source control. That’s not what I need here. I need it to actually make an appearance. 🙂

  10. Ken says:

    Actually, nevermind. Figured it out. Turns out I didn’t have the VSS client installed on my new machine. Thanks 🙂

  11. Jiho Han says:

    I have a solution with 4 projects and Scc* fields for some of the projects are SAK, but some have actual values like "MSSCCI:Microsoft Visual SourceSafe" for SccProvider, "$/ROOT/PATH" for SccProjectName, for example.

    What’s the difference?

    And for some reason at the moment, every time I load the solution in the IDE, one particular project gets unbound. I rebind it, save all, close the IDE, reopen, same thing.

    Any idea?

  12. Jiho Han says:

    While we’re on the subject, I’ve been looking at *.vsscc and *.vspscc files. And some of these fields in the same solution file are also different.

    In particular,

    1. What does ENLISTMENT_CHOICE do?

    2. SOURCE_CONTROL_SETTINGS_PROVIDER is either set to PROJECT or PROVIDER. What’s the difference?

    3. Some have values for PROJECT_FILE_RELATIVE_PATH and ORIGINAL_PROJECT_FILE_PATH. Are these just informational?

    Thanks

  13. Ranjith Venkatesh says:

    Hi,

    The menu items under File–>Source Control in VS.NET 2003 are disabled. Is there a way to enable them?

    Ranjith.

  14. Thank you for this post, this error has been driving me nuts, and you solution worked like a charm.

  15. GumboYaYa says:

    Thanx, that message box was driving me mad. Cheers Mate!

  16. Aditya says:

    Well…this is how my problem starts. My machine crashed and I had to reinstall everything. After reinstalling the OS and all the softwares and mappping the working directories and getting the latest version when I tried to open a project I was working on previously I got the following message: "The solution appears to be under source control, but its binding information cannot be found. It is possible that the MSSCCPRJ.SCC file or another item that holds the source control settings for the solution, has been deleted. Because it is not possible to recover this missing information automatically, the projects whose bindings are missing will be treated as not under source control."

    When I click OK it is followed by this message: "Some of the properties associated with the solution could not be read."

    The file menu on my VS.Net does not show any option about the Source Control. When I go to Tool->Options->Visual SourceSafe->SCC Provider the Login ID is disabled when normally it should show my domain username. Please help me if you can.

  17. Yatin R Kotwal says:

    My troubles stsrted when I reinstalled VSS, VS kept prompting about the solution not being under source control. Also the menus to add solution to source control was disabled. Well I located the file "ssint.exe" and clicked on it and ran it that enabled my menus and i could add the proj through VS environment back to source control. Ensure that this exe is available on the server.

  18. Gergana says:

    Your blog is very interesint

  19. LowOrbit says:

    I followed tip #3, removing those 4 lines from *.csproj in my solution and the annoying error is gone! Thanks for the tip.

  20. Your site is very informational for me. Nice work.

  21. jerry li says:

    I copyed this form msdn forum :" I suspect you have a problem loading the VSS MSSCCI dll (ssscc.dll) into the VisualStudio, probably because of a dependency dll that cannot be found.You can try re-registering the VSS dlls (regsvr32.exe ssscc.dll)", hope may be useful.

  22. JerryLi says:

    I copyed this form msdn forum :" I suspect you have a problem loading the VSS MSSCCI dll (ssscc.dll) into the VisualStudio, probably because of a dependency dll that cannot be found.You can try re-registering the VSS dlls (regsvr32.exe ssscc.dll)", hope may be useful

  23. Maxim says:

    Hey, re-registering the DLL solved my problem, thanks!

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  25. Jogen says:

    Option 3 is great. The annoying error was gone once I removed the lines from all the projects that had them.

    Thanks.

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  29. Mike Malter says:

    I can’t get VSS to work in Visual Studio 2003 at all now.  One day, I started getting those error messages, but even after deleting all vss files, I could not get the VSS menu option to appear.  Even all of the items on the source control toolbar are disabled.

    I have VSS 2005 installed on this machine.  Did I hose my configuration by installing it?

    Thanks.

    Mike

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