MSBuild is the [extensible, scalable,
transparent] next generation build engine and platform for Visual Studio
.NET.  Many of our sharpest PMs, developers, testers, and yes, even
writers, are feverishly working on this project.

A number of folks with whom I’ve discussed MSBuild–including
several enterprise development consultants in the field–believe that it
just might be the single most important feature innovation in our pipeline.
And if you consider how many one-off build tools and convoluted
prescriptive build processes have been developed (or evolved) since
the release of VS.NET 2002, it’s hard to argue with them.

Now, YOU can get a href="">Sneak
Peak of MSBuild at the PDC in LA. Thanks to href="">Chris for
the link.

“Introducing MSBuild: The Universal Build Engine for Visual Studio “Whidbey”
and “Longhorn”
Track: Tools and Languages   Code:
Speakers: Alex Kipman, Rajeev Goel
MSBuild is the next generation
build engine that delivers scalability and flexibility for the entire range of
build scenarios, from the basics to complex build-lab scenarios. Drill into the
capabilities of this universal build engine for Visual Studio “Whidbey” and the
“Longhorn” operating system–from its XML-based persistence model and
human-readable file format, to its ability to assist in the creation of build
steps and processes for Visual Studio projects.”

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style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt">This posting is provided “AS IS”
with no warranties, and confers no

Comments (22)

  1. This is a separate issue, but is SourceSafe going to be revised for Whidbey? And why do I need to sign an NDA to see the SCC API?

  2. David Levine says:

    Will MSBuild support version control systems other then Source Safe (e.g. ClearCase)?

    Will there be support for additional operations, such as configurable email notifications? Releaase notes handling?


  3. Yes, yes, yes, and yes. MSBuild is an open and extensible build system that integrates with Visual Studio .NET at very low level. Likewise, source control plug-ins such as SourceSafe and ClearCase integrate with Visual Studio .NET by hooking into its native Source Code Control Integration (SCCI) services. I really don’t know how tightly MSBuild will be linked to SCCI out-of-box, but the automation and extensibility infrastructure that underlies them both will allow you to do practically anything you might need. If there’s a particular feature or two you would like to see, this is as good a place to post ’em as any.

  4. AsbjornM says:

    Is it so thight integrated with VS.NET so we will need another VS.NET license for the build-server?

  5. Alex Kipman [MSFT] says:

    Is it so tight integrated with VS.NET so we will need another VS.NET license for the build-server?
    >>> To quickly answer this question, MSBuild will ship with the .NET redistributable not Visual Studio. This means that you can use MSBuild in an environment where VS is not present. A good way of thinking about this is that VS is very highly integrated with MSBuild, but MSBuild does not have any dependencies on VS.

    Hope this clarifies. If you have other questions about MSBuild feel free to drop me a line.

  6. tropico says:

    Wy rewrite tool that already exists and are widely used ?

  7. AsbjornM says:

    If NAnt is soo good, why is there so many writing such software?
    NAnt is surely an good tool, But in my recent fights with that beast I want use in the near future again.
    It’s bad documented, dificult to manage, doesnt understand projectfiles for (not vb projectfiles anyway).
    But it features are good, if it was posible to understand and use them. I for my part has used way to much time on it.

  8. Nant is great as a standalone build tool; the problem is that it has lousy Visual Studio integration. If you’re not a VS user, you’d probably be very happy with Nant. Of course, almost all .NET developers are VS users, for better or worse.

    On the Java side, Ant is more popular, because a) there is a significant non-IDE-using group of developers, and b) most of the IDEs provide integrated build support using Ant.

    As fond as I am of Ant and Nant, I’ll be glad to see this MSBuild if it allows transparent, flexible, non-interactive builds while also enjoying good IDE integration.

  9. N. V. says:

    Nant support for VS solution and project was a new feature of the last release, and by seeing all what’s going on in the devs mailing list i can tell that it’s constantly being improved. Being one of the latests taks added to NAnt it’s normal that it need a bit of time to get improvement and many of them seems to be planned.

  10. Boris Partensky says:

    Is there a place where I could find examples of PROJ file format as well as XAML projects? I just started exploring Whidbee/WinFS and looking for a jump-start place. Maybe it is in PDC bits somwhere, and I couldn’t find it?

    Thanks a lot.