A to-do list.

The last several months have been packed with planning our next set of features in the international space — talking to customers about what they need and what they want, looking at the teams we have and seeing where our skills are up to the challenges ahead and where we need improvement, and looking at…

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Information central.

Just in time for the Vista street date, the Vista International Support Portal is live at www.microsoft.com/globaldev/vista/vistahome.mspx! It contains lots of information about the locales, language packs, LIPs, fonts, and keyboards that we ship, and it makes a handy reference to figure out which languages and regions have support in Vista. You can also visit…

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What comes around goes around.

Yes, it’s been a while. Since I’ve last blogged, we’ve shipped Vista and I’ve gone on a long vacation to Hawaii. Personally I find both of these things very exciting. It’s understandable if you care more about the first than the second. 🙂 But I’m back from vacation and into planning mode for our next…

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Oh, the enumeration? Part two.

A few days ago, in Oh, the enumeration!, I wrote about some changes to the enumeration of our Spanish Traditional sort locale that would be new for Vista. What I wrote is that callers to EnumSystemLocales would have to pass the LCID_ALTERNATE_SORTS flag to return 040a (Spanish Traditional sort) in Vista. Well, based on customer feedback,…

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From Afrikaans to Yoruba.

Today someone asked me whether there is anywhere on the internet that customers can find the Vista locale list. Several of us have blogged about custom locales and the ways in which customers might use them, but I wanted to post the full list of built-in Windows locales here so that is is convenient for…

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Oh, the enumeration!

Note (10/3/06): This post contains outdated content. For the correction, please see the update in Oh, the enumeration? Part two.   If you use EnumSystemLocales(), one thing you may have noticed in Vista is that the Spanish Traditional sort locale (040a) is no longer included in our enumeration. The locale still exists, so you can ask for…

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What’s in a name? Part two.

Back in the day, in a post entitled What’s in a name?, I blogged about some changes to NLS identifiers that we made in order to better meet the expectations of customers accustomed to the IETF standard. In that post, I wrote: One thing to keep in mind regarding the highlighted entries above is that…

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Develop locally, think globally!

So you want to develop a globalized application for Windows. You’re up to speed on development best practices, you’re going to be using Unicode, you know how to use Windows APIs and locale data to enhance the user experience you create. So how do you identify and support the right target market for launching your product?…

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Not all custom locales are created equal.

If you’re going to use the Locale Builder tool to create a custom locale, you have a couple of options: You can create a brand new locale for a language-region combination that is not currently supported by Microsoft, or you can replace a locale that exists on your machine with appropriately customized data. If you…

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So I want Windows to support my language. How does that happen, exactly?

One of the disappointing things about the end of a product cycle is that it’s too late to add into this version all the cool new customer requests that we get. (Of course, the flip side of this is that one of the great things about new product cycles is that we have lots of…

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