AppDomain.AppendPrivatePath is obsolete

In .Net framework 2.0, AppDomain.AppendPrivatePath is marked as obsolete. The deprecation is explained in Gotdotnet.com’s break change web site http://www.gotdotnet.com/team/changeinfo/Backwards1.1to2.0/default.aspx#00000102 <quote> Title Cache load failures in order to ensure that different app domains do not have different dependency loading success/failure characteristics in domain neutral sharing scenarios. Area System.Reflection Affected APIs Deprecating Appdomain.AppendPrivatePath and Appdomain.ClearPrivatePath Affected…

11

App.config reloading

I have seen the same question asked many times.   “I changed app.config while the application is running. But the application does not read the change, unless I restart the application. What should I do?”   .Net framework will read the app.config once, and never touch the app.config again. That is why you have to…

23

NGEN, now and then

MSDN magazine just posted a great article about NGEN, written by Reid Wilkes. It is a wonderful read if you want to know how NGEN works, and how to use NGEN. The article is here: NGen Revs Up Your Performance with Powerful New Featureshttp://msdn.microsoft.com/msdnmag/issues/05/04/NGen/default.aspx Reid also started blogging recently. His blog can be reached at…

0

Netmodule vs. Assembly

In .Net framework Assembly is the minimum unit of deployment. You cannot deploy anything less than an assembly. To CLR, a type does not exist outside of the context of an assembly.   Assembly can contain one or more files. The files can be any physical files. They can be a resource file, a netmodule,…

7

linkedConfiguration — a.k.a include in config file

It is common to share an assembly between several applications.   Typically you will install the assembly to GAC. When you want to service the assembly, you create a publisher policy assembly, and install the publisher policy assembly to GAC. All the applications automatically pick up the service.   There are other solutions if you…

1

Duplicate entries in config files

If there are multiple (conflicting) policy statements for the same assembly in a config file, which policy will fusion take? In .Net v1.0/v1.1, we will take the first policy. The rest policies are practically no-op. In .Net 2.0, we will preserve the same behavior. An example of config file with duplicate entries is shown below:…

0

Assembly ProcessorArchitecture and Binding Policy

By now we know assemblies compiled with .Net 2.0 will have ProcessorArchitecture.   And we know from Josh’s blog, that applications with processorArchitecture MSIL will run as 64 bit processes on 64 bit OS. And of course they will run as 32 bit processes on 32 bit OS.   If my MSIL application depends on…

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