Azure Development Storage Database Deleted


Story goes something like this (btw, autonumber in Live Writer won’t let me start at 0):

  1. Install the tools and sdk to do some Azure development.
  2. I decide to install a non-Express version of SQL Server 2008.
  3. I decide I no longer need the SQL Express installation and uninstall it.
  4. time goes by…..
  5. One day I decide, after an Azure break, that I need to try something out and fire up studio.
  6. After creating a new web role and making some changes on a page I attempt to debug.
  7. Development Fabric starts
  8. Development Storage fails

Upon a little bit of investigation I find that it cannot connect to the SQL Express instance against which it was installed – duh.  If you’ve pulled a similar trick then the following should help.  Looking a little more I find is that there is a config file (C:\Program Files\Windows Azure SDK\v1.0\bin\DevelopmentStorage.exe.config) that contains two elements that seem interesting to me:

<connectionStrings>
<add name="DevelopmentStorageDbConnectionString"
       connectionString="Data Source=.\SQLEXPRESS;Initial Catalog=DevelopmentStorageDb;Integrated Security=True"
       providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />
</connectionStrings>

and

  <service name="Table"
               url="http://127.0.0.1:10002/"
                     dbServer="localhost\SQLExpress"/>
     

So, I changed them to

<connectionStrings>
  <add name="DevelopmentStorageDbConnectionString"
   connectionString="Data Source=localhost;Initial Catalog=DevelopmentStorageDb;Integrated Security=True"
   providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />
</connectionStrings>

and

<service name="Table"
               url="http://127.0.0.1:10002/"
               dbServer="localhost" />

However, this still doesn’t solve the base problem that I have in that I basically deleted the original data files.  Had I uninstalled and kept the data files I could connect them into the current default instance of SQL Server on the box, but, in fact, I did not have them and they had to be recreated.  This was fortunately easier than I expected it might be.  To finish up the “repair” of my development environment I did the following:

  1. Open Windows Azure SDK Environment command prompt
  2. Execute the command dsinit /sqlinstance:. /forcecreate /user:[windows account name]

Now you should have the needed database on the default instance and you should be able to debug your project successfully as the development storage should work again.


Comments (1)

  1. Waqas says:

    Thank you so much. This post really helped.

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