The Replies Come Piling In


So far I’ve had about a dozen emails and a cluster of posts about what a “Live” version of VS could look like. The ideas are really good (meaning, of course, that I agree with them ;-). Some interesting ones:



  • Pair Programming via RTC. Greg Duncan suggested this (though he didn’t quite phrase it like this) but the idea that you could with with a partner in pair programming without having them right there, is interesting. If nothing else, these suggestions would open up the IDE to collaboration in a new way.

  • Ship Agility. TZagotta hit on the notion that we could/should get more agile in how/when we ship updates if we went this route, which is something I wholeheartedly agree with.

  • Hosted VSTS. ARuiter scored big with the idea of hosting TFS, Team Test, and a whole bunch of our SDLC solution. This is obviously a big surface area with lots of nuances. I talked with Brian Harry (the TFS PUM) about this idea in December and he told me that TFS was architected to support this kind of scenario and then had to get off the phone so that he could work on shipping V1 of TFS. 🙂

  • Better Online. Xepol touched on a concern I’ve heard from other customers: that whatever we build shouldn’t be totally dependent on a network connection and that if we build a set of services they have to be rock-solid. Totally agree.

Another theme that’s coming out: whatever we do, it has to be better than opening a window in IE and as easy to work with as visiting a Web site or using a Hosted Exchange account.


I love these ideas and keep them coming!


Comments (1)

  1. e.w. says:

    To me, a live development/collaboration environment has some pretty far-reaching implications for open-source-like projects, where the number and location of collaborators is determined at runtime, as it were. It would lower the barrier to the production of software in the same ways blogging and wikis have affected news and topical references. Because a live Visual Studio would inherently activate the use of Microsoft technologies for projects using a Tuscany environment, I think you should consider making it as cheap and easy to create and link to a hosted development environment as possible.

    I also envision being able to quickly link to and generate project templates, that would make the generation of a desired component as simple as possible. Imagine start.com’s developer center not only explaining how to develop a gadget, but hosting a templated environment and it’s dependencies from within a single click of that page.

    As other commenters have pointed out, source control integration will be vital. Specifically, live CVS and subversion development sessions that "just work."

    Consider the way that google indexes your e-mail with gmail, and the metadata they gain from mining those indices, and the rather effective contextual advertisements they place next to your e-mail. Now imagine doing the same thing to code! Emergent design patterns or recommended snippets might be feasible from the attention metadata harvested from Tuscany’s user base. Of course, this would have to be architected in a way that would protect the privacy of any codebase wanting to maintain that attribute. 🙂

    Also, please let me know when you’re hiring developers! And then, please hire me!