MSMQ and WCF – hands-on lab now available


Back in November, I mentioned that the Hands-On Lab would be available at the end of 2007. Well, it’s only a month late  🙂


So if you are intersted in “SOA’izing MSMQ with WCF (and Why It’s Worth It)



Microsoft Message Queuing’s (MSMQ) integration with the Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) is extremely powerful. It enables MSMQ developers to write fault-tolerant, service-oriented applications and provides a robust extensibility model developers can use to improve any system’s capabilities – including MSMQ’s. During this lab you’ll convert a System.Messaging application into a WCF Queuing application, enable that application to overcome MSMQ’s 4mb message size limitation, and integrate it seamlessly with existing MSMQ applications.  


then the Hands-On Lab is now available from MSDN’s Code Gallery website. If you don’t know, Code Gallery is a new site MSDN built to provide a home for samples that don’t quite fit on a blog but are not substantial enough to make a full project out of.


http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/msmqpluswcf


 


In addition to the Visual Studio solution file and the documentation we provided at TechEd, Justin has also provided a video overview that walks you through the lab (for those not particularly inclined to read long documents).


 


Any feedback gratefully appreciated.

Comments (4)

  1. MSMQ from the plumber’s mate has this article MSMQ and WCF – hands-on lab now available Microsoft Message

  2. so we meet again… WCF Diversity Training! I picked that up from David Chappell’s whitepaper on Dealing

  3. Robert says:

    Hi,

    I have a general question about a message queueing system.  I currently do not have a message queueing system in place.  However, it has bbecome apparent that one is going to be needed.  So, if I am starting from scratch should I simply use WCF or combine MSMQ with WCF as the lab demonstrated.

    Thanks,

    Robert

  4. MSDNArchive says:

    If you are using WCF then you need to use a transport binding of one form or another – TCP, Named Pipes, HTTP, HTTPS, MSMQ, etc. If you have requirements that only the MSMQ transport can provide then go with NetMsmqBinding.