And While I’m complaining about Vista Security.


This really puzzled me.

AccessDenied

How can MY OWN pictures file be access denied. (Especially since in an admin on the box.)

I asked my peers who quickly suggested that it was a parental controls thing because I’d put something naughty in my pictures folder  (Not True)

Turns out that Vista creates a link in your documents folder to your Pictures folder so that legacy applications that expect such a link will work, but the Windows Explorer coughs on the link and throws this security error if you try and use that link to navigate TO the folder. (… and I thought that’s what links were for.)  

Now, I’m sure this makes sense to somebody – just not to me  

Comments (2)

  1. Lionel says:

    > How can MY OWN pictures file be access denied.

    > (Especially since in an admin on the box.)

    Well, file and directory permissions can deny access to anyone, including the owner or administrators. Of course, being the owner (or an administrator) makes it possible for you to change these permissions.

    > (… and I thought that’s what links were for.)

    This one is *hidden*, so that’s certainly not what it is for.

    > Now, I’m sure this makes sense to somebody

    AFAIK, this hidden symlink is here for compatibility with applications that hardcode the "My Pictures" string instead of getting the path from the Shell API. The correct directory name in Vista is "Pictures" (without "My"). As for the permissions, they allow traversing the symlink to get to other files but deny enumerating the content of the directory (which causes the access denied error), so that it doesn’t break applications that assume the filesystem is a tree (and have no knowledge of symlinks and junctions).

  2. John Walker says:

    Joe,

    I saw this same behavior when I chose to show hidden files and folders. These shortcuts showed up, but I think they are actually Vista "junctions". Scott Hanselman knows what they are, but I’m still trying to figure them out 🙂