Table of Cool .NET Tools


Here are some cool .NET tools from MSDN / codeplex, complete with Download and tutorial links.






































Tool Summary Where to get it Links
CLR Profiler Easy way to measure memory performance for managed apps. Download for .NET 2.0, .NET 1.1 Tutorial
Perf Console Awesome for analyzing performance issues for apps.
This makes perf analysis surprisingly easy to do and is perfect for the non-perf person.
Download Demo, details
Power Shell A shell scripting language that’s infinitely better than batch files. Download Tutorial, Blog, MSDN
Iron Python Python on .NET See link on homepage. Source code Homepage, Tutorial included in download.
MS Build Way better than NMake. Included in .NET redist. Tutorial, Blog, Forum
MDbg Managed wrappers for debugging managed apps. Download (Also in the SDK) Forum, Other Links

 


Comments (10)

  1. Q says:

    Your post is titled "cool .NET tools" but all the tools you are listing are done by Microsoft. The only place where cool .NET tools are done lately is Microsoft??? Sounds like Microsoft mono-culture is starting all over again…

  2. jmstall says:

    Q – My first line explicitly states "from MSDN / codeplex".

    Feel free to post a link to your favorite non-MS .NET tools.

  3. Sam Gentile says:

    Lots of great stuff this time. CLR/Interop There has always been a ton of confusion about CLR assembly

  4. joshwil says:

    Q — while all these tools are being released by MS many of them started as pet projects by people who just happen to work at MS (or later joined MS) and then some of them ended up with more support by the powers that be.

    For instance:

     – PerfConsole: I wrote this just to play around with managed code and make my job easier and is now released to the public as a sample.

     – MDbg: written by another member of the CLR team to scratch an itch which then became a primary tool for testing the CLR and now is released to the public as a sample.

     – CLRProfiler: written by Peter Solich just because it seemed like a good thing to do and it turned out great

     – IronPython: started by Jim to prove that the CLR sucked, he ended up coming to a different conclusion, so much so that he joined the CLR team.

    I guess in the end it’s not too surprising however that Mike came across a number of tools built by CLR team members, we all work in the same building, on the same floor and run into each other all the time.

    -josh

  5. May I suggest Lutz Roeder’s Reflector for .NET

    http://www.aisto.com/roeder/dotnet/

    "Reflector is the class browser, explorer, analyzer and documentation viewer for .NET. Reflector allows to easily view, navigate, search, decompile and analyze .NET assemblies in C#, Visual Basic and IL."

  6. Tim S says:

    I agree with Mike and Josh. These are good tools to know. Here are some other cool tools:

    Scott Hanselmans’s list of awesome tools – http://www.hanselman.com/blog/ScottHanselmans2005UltimateDeveloperAndPowerUsersToolList.aspx

    GnuWin32 tools – http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/packages.html

    Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit Tools – http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=9d467a69-57ff-4ae7-96ee-b18c4790cffd&displaylang=en

  7. Sam Gentile says:

    Lots of great stuff this time. CLR/Interop There has always been a ton of confusion about CLR assembly

  8. Lots of great stuff this time. CLR/Interop There has always been a ton of confusion about CLR assembly version numbers since 1999 and a lot of people don’t understand all the different version numbers. Luckily, Richard is starting a series on them with