How Smart is Your City Transportation?


How easy is it to get around in your city from point A to point B?

Here’s an interesting article that rounds up some of the latest ideas:

Getting Around in European capitals: How smart is your city?

I really like this—talk about impact:

Autolib’ has taken thousands of cars off the roads, brought down driving costs by 90% and is reducing pollution by millions of metric tons per year.

Dense city + mass transit creates opportunities.

According to the article, here are what some cities are doing:

  1. In London, Transport of London implemented a contactless payment system, so users can just “touch in and out” to pay. When you’re dealing with a billion commuters a year, that’s a big deal.   Using Internet-of-Things, developers can use the sensors across London’s transport system, along with meaningful data in the Cloud, to build better transport apps that address technical incidents and protect passengers in new ways.
  2. In Paris, the Internet-of-Things made it possible to create Autolib, an electronic car-sharing solution. The fleet of electronic cars is managed centrally in the Cloud, allowing users to rent cars from kiosks and easily find charging stations. And users can easily find parking, too, with GPS-enabled parking.
  3. In Barcelona, they are using Internet-of-Things to improve Bicing, their bicycle sharing program. They can use sensors to monitor bicycle usage and detect issues between supply and demand. They can use that insight to distribute bikes better so that the bikes can be used in a more sustainable way. It’s smart logistics for bicycles in action.
  4. In Helsinki, they are using Internet-of-Things to get more value out of their 400 buses. By measuring acceleration, speed, engine temperature, fuel consumption, brake performance, and GPS location, they reduce fuel consumption, improve driver performance, and provide safer bus rides.

I also like how the article framed the challenge right up front by painting the scene of a common scenario where you have to stitch together various modes of transport to reach your destination:

“You just need to take Bus 2 for three stops,
then change to Bus 8 towards the City station,
walk for 10 minutes towards the docks,
then take Line 5 on the metro for 5 stops.
Then call a taxi.”

You can imagine all the opportunities to reimagine how people get around, and how inclusive the design can be (whether that means helping blind people safely find their next stop, or helping somebody from out of town, navigate their way around.)

Depending on how big the city is and how far out the city is spread, there is still room for Uber and Lyft to help stitch the end-to-end mass transit journey together.

And I wonder how long before Amazon’s Now drivers, go from local residents that fulfill orders, to become another ride share option (do Uber drivers become Amazon Now or do Amazon Now become Uber drivers?).


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