Emotional Intelligence is a Key Leadership Skill


You probably already know that emotional intelligence, or “EQ”, is a key to success in work and life.

Emotional intelligence is the ability to identify, assess, and control the emotions of yourself, others, and groups.

It’s the key to helping you respond vs. react.  When we react, it’s our lizard brain in action.  When we respond, we are aware of our emotions, but they are input, and they don’t rule our actions.  Instead, emotions inform our actions.

Emotional intelligence is how you avoid letting other people push your buttons.  And, at the same time, you can push your own buttons, because of your self-awareness.  

Emotional intelligence takes empathy.  Empathy, simply put, is the ability to understand and share the feelings of others. 

When somebody is intelligent, and has a high IQ, you would think that they would be successful.

But, if there is a lack of EQ (emotional intelligence), then their relationships suffer.

As a result, their effectiveness, their influence, and their impact are marginalized.

That’s what makes emotional intelligence such an important and powerful leadership skill.

And, it’s emotional intelligence that often sets leaders apart.

Truly exceptional leaders, not only demonstrate emotional intelligence, but within emotional intelligence, they stand out.

Outstanding leaders shine in the following 7 emotional intelligence competencies: Self-reliance, Assertiveness, Optimism, Self-Actualization, Self-Confidence, Relationship Skills, and Empathy.

I’ve summarized 10 Big Ideas from Emotional Capitalists: The Ultimate Guide to Developing Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.  It’s an insightful book by Martyn Newman, and it’s one of the best books I’ve read on the art and science of emotional intelligence.   What sets this book apart is that Newman focused on turning emotional intelligence into a skill you can practice, with measurable results (he has a scoring system.)

If there’s one take away, it’s really this.  The leaders that get the best results know how to get employees and customers emotionally invested in the business.  

Without emotional investment, people don’t bring out their best and you end up with a brand that’s blah.

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Comments (1)

  1. John Hunter says:

    I agree that emotional intelligence is important.  There have been several people taking swipes at the idea recently.  Any idea can be misused (and in business management it seems to me most are, sadly).  But the keep concepts behind emotional intelligence I think are important for managers (and really everyone).  I would put the keys as confidence and relationships (and understanding the emotional reactions of others is key to relationships).

    I have long been a bit "hung up" on confidence, so I could easily be overstating it.  It just seems to me so many issues relating to emotions, interpersonal relationships etc. are made much more difficult when you have to be overly concerned with upsetting someone (which is often a matter of confidence).  Obviously this is a greatly over-simplified explanation…

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